Letter

[alphabet] A letter is a grapheme in an alphabetic system of writing, such as the Greek alphabet and its descendants. Letters compose phonemes and each phoneme represents a phone (sound) in the spoken form of the language. Written signs in other writing systems are best called syllabograms (which denote a syllable) or logograms (which denot
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_(alphabet)

Letter

[paper size] Letter or US Letter is the most common paper size for office use in several countries, including the United States, Canada, Mexico, Bolivia, Colombia, Venezuela, the Philippines, and Chile. It measures 8.5 by 11 inches (215.9 mm × 279.4 mm). Ronald Reagan made this the paper size for U.S. federal forms in the early 1980s; prev
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_(paper_size)

letter

[n] - owner who lets another person use something (housing usually) for hire 2. [n] - a strictly literal interpretation (as distinct from the intention) 3. [n] - the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech 4. [n] - an award earned by participation in a school sport 5. [n] - a written message addressed
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=letter

letter

Written or printed message, chiefly a personal communication. Letters are valuable as reflections of social conditions and of literary and political life. Legally, ownership of a letter (as a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Letter

Let'ter (lĕt'tẽr) noun [ From Let to permit.] One who lets or permits; one who lets anything for hire.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/32

Letter

Let'ter noun [ From Let to hinder.] One who retards or hinders. [ Archaic.]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/32

Letter

Let'ter noun [ Middle English lettre , French lettre , Old French letre , from Latin littera , litera , a letter; plural, an epistle, a writing, literature, from linere , litum , to besmear, to spread or rub over; because one of the earliest modes of w
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/32

Letter

Let'ter (lĕt'tẽr) transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Lettered (-tẽrd); present participle & verbal noun Lettering .] To impress with letters; to mark with letters or words; as, a book gilt and lettered
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/32

Letter

Let'ter noun (Teleg.) A telegram longer than an ordinary message sent at rates lower than the standard message rate in consideration of its being sent and delivered subject to priority in service of regular messages. Such telegrams are called by the Western Union Company day, or night, letters
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/32

letter

Written or printed communication between individuals or between persons and representatives of corporate bodies. The correspondence may be personal or professional. In medical and other scientific publications the letter is usually from one or more authors to the editor of the journal or book publishing the item being commented upon or discussed. L
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?letter

letter

missive noun a written message addressed to a person or organization; `mailed an indignant letter to the editor`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=letter

letter

noun owner who lets another person use something (housing usually) for hire
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=letter

letter

verb mark letters on or mark with letters
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=letter

letter

verb win an athletic letter
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=letter

letter

alphabetic character noun the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech; `his grandmother taught him his letters`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=letter

letter

noun an award earned by participation in a school sport; `he won letters in three sports`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=letter

Letter

• (n.) A writing; an inscription. • (n.) A written or printed communication; a message expressed in intelligible characters on something adapted to conveyance, as paper, parchment, etc.; an epistle. • (n.) A single type; type, collectively; a style of type. • (n.) A letter; an epistle. • (n.) A mark or character used as the
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/letter/

letter

(from the article `cryptology`) A code is simply an unvarying rule for replacing a piece of information (e.g., letter, word, or phrase) with another object, but not necessarily of ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/38

letter

(from the article `Latin literature`) The idea of comparing Romans with foreigners was taken up by Cornelius Nepos, a friend of Cicero and Catullus. Of his De viris illustribus all that ... ...its poetry, though there was a wealth of diaries and memoirs. Outstanding were the memoirs of Jan Chryzostom Pasek, a country squire and soldier....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/38

letter

(from the article `postal system`) The raw material of the postal services, always a single object that demands individual treatment, is something sent by one person (or entity) to ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/38

Letter

[message] A letter is a written message containing information from one party to another. The role of letters in communication has changed significantly since the nineteenth century. Historically, letters (in paper form) were the only reliable means of communication between two persons in different locations. As communication technology has
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_(message)

letter

letter: see alphabet.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0915588.html

letter

Written or printed message, chiefly a personal communication. Letters are valuable as reflections of social conditions and of literary and political life. Legally, ownership of a letter (as a document) passes to the recipient, but the copyright remains with the writer. Outstanding examples include: Ancient Cicero (Roman), Pliny the Younger (Rom...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0004479.html
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