Fuchsia

(Lady's Eardrops) These tender shrubs are mainly natives of Central and South America and New Zealand. They are great plants for greenhouses, window boxes, baskets, homes, and flower beds. In areas where Fuchsias are hardy enough to live outdoors they can grow into beautiful, tall shrubs and may be planted to form hedges. In less mild areas of Nort
Found on http://www.botany.com/fuchsia.html

fuchsia

[n] - any of various tropical shrubs widely cultivated for their showy drooping purplish or reddish or white flowers 2. [n] - a dark purple-red
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=fuchsia

Fuchsia

Fuch'si·a noun ; plural English Fuchsias , Latin Fuchsiæ . [ New Latin Named after Leonard Fuchs , a German botanist.] (Botany) A genus of flowering plants having elegant drooping flowers, with four sepals, four petals, eight stamens, and a single pistil. They are n
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/83

fuchsia

Origin: NL. Named after Leonard Fuchs, a German botanist. ... <botany> A genus of flowering plants having elegant drooping flowers, with four sepals, four petals, eight stamens, and a single pistil. They are natives of Mexico and South America. Double-flowered varieties are now common in cultivation. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Ma
Found on http://www.mondofacto.com/facts/dictionary?fuchsia

fuchsia

magenta noun a dark purple-red; the dye was discovered in 1859, the year of the battle of Magenta
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=fuchsia

Fuchsia

• (n.) A genus of flowering plants having elegant drooping flowers, with four sepals, four petals, eight stamens, and a single pistil. They are natives of Mexico and South America. Double-flowered varieties are now common in cultivation.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/fuchsia/

Fuchsia

genus of about 100 species of flowering shrubs and trees, in the evening primrose family (Onagraceae), native to the tropical and subtropical ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/67

fuchsia

fuchsia: see evening primrose.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0913637.html

Fuchsia

The fuchsia (named after their discoverer Leonard Fuchs, a German botanist) is a genus of plants of the family Onagraceae native to South America, Mexico, and New Zealand. They have erect, much-branched stems, smooth, rather thick pointed leaves, and drooping heavy flowers borne singly in the axils of leaves towards the end of the branches. The flo
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/BF.HTM

fuchsia

Any shrub or herbaceous plant of a group belonging to the evening-primrose family. Species are native to South and Central America and New Zealand, and bear red, purple, or pink bell-shaped flowers that hang downwards. (Genus Fuchsia, family Onagraceae.) The genus was named...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0010850.html

Fuchsia

[disambiguation] Fuchsia (often misspelled `Fuschia`) can refer to: ==Organisms== ==Other== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuchsia_(disambiguation)

Fuchsia

[color] Fuchsia (ə, {respell|FEW|shə}) is a vivid purplish red color, named after the flower of the fuchsia plant, which took its name from the 16th century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs. The color fuchsia was first introduced as the color of a new aniline dye called fuchsine, patented in 1859 by the French chemist Francois-Emmanuel Verg
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuchsia_(color)

Fuchsia

== Description == There are currently almost 110 recognized species of Fuchsia. The vast majority are native to South America, but with a few occurring north through Central America to Mexico, and also several from New Zealand to Tahiti. One species, F. magellanica, extends as far as the southern tip of South America, occurring on Tierra del Fuego
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuchsia
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