Fiscus

Fiscus, from which comes the English term fiscal, was the name of the personal treasury of the emperors of Rome. The word is literally translated as "basket" or "purse" and was used to describe those forms of revenue collected from the provinces (specifically the imperial provinces), which were then granted to the emperor. Its existence pointe...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiscus

fiscus

In ancient Rome, a fund or treasury. Under the Roman empire, the word came to denote the emperor's funds (hence the word `fiscal`), as distinct from the aerarium or public treasury, which...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

fiscus

The Imperial treasury.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Fiscus

Imperial treasury.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20764

fiscus

the Roman emperor`s treasury (where money was stored in baskets), as opposed to the public treasury (aerarium). It drew money primarily from revenues ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/30

Fiscus

Lat. The King's personal land and properties.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/f044.htm

Fiscus

Properly, a fiscus is a wicker basket or pannier. However, from the Roman custom of carrying money in such receptacles the word came to mean a money- chest, and, after establishment of the empire, the treasury of the emperor as distinct from that of the state which was called aerarium.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AF.HTM
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