Congius

Con'gi·us noun [ Latin ] 1. (Roman Antiq.) A liquid measure containing about three quarts. 2. (Medicine) A gallon, or four quarts. [ Often abbreviated to cong. ]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/136

Congius

• (n.) A gallon, or four quarts. • (n.) A liquid measure containing about three quarts.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/congius/

congius

(from the article `measurement system`) ...and amphora for dry products and the quartarus, sextarius, congius, urna, and amphora for liquids. Since all of these were based on the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/127

Congius

In Ancient Roman measurement, congius (pl. congii, from Greek konkhion, diminutive of konkhē, konkhos, `shellful`) was a liquid measure that was about 3.48 litres (0.92 U.S. gallons). It was equal to the larger chous of the Ancient Greeks. The congius contained six sextarii. Cato tells us that he was wont to give each of his slaves a congius of..
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congius

Congius

This ancient Roman measure of capacity (from the Latin clam or shell) was next to the Sextarius one of the most common standard sizes in ancient Rome. Fluids were originally calculated according to weight, but are caused by a myriad of hollow sizes. The largest known unit of volume was the 160 Congii comprehensive Culleus (= leather bag, tube) with
Found on http://www.wein-plus.eu/en/Congius_3.0.5637.html
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