apostrophe

Plural form: apostrophes. A punctuation mark used to show when letters have been missed out of words or that something belongs to something else.
Example: The party's booked for Friday. That's George's birthday.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Apostrophe

a sudden turn from the general audience to address a specific group or person or personified abstraction absent or present.
*For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel. Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him. Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

Apostrophe

Poem which is directly addressed to a person or thing (often absent). An example is Wordsworth's sonnet Milton which begins: 'Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour'. NB not to be confused with an apostrophe indicating missing letters or the possessive case. Other examples of apostrophe include A Supermarket in California by Allen Ginsberg (a
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

apostrophe

[n] - address to an absent or imaginary person 2. [n] - the mark (`) used to indicate the omission of one or more letters from a printed word
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=apostrophe

Apostrophe

A·pos'tro·phe noun [ (1) Latin , from Greek ... a turning away, from ... to turn away; ... from + ... to turn. (2) F., from Latin apostrophus apostrophe, the turning away or omitting of a letter, Greek ....] 1. (Rhet.) A figure of speech by which the orator or writer suddenly break
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/105

apostrophe

noun address to an absent or imaginary person
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=apostrophe

Apostrophe

• (n.) The mark [`] used to denote that a word is contracted (as in ne`er for never, can`t for can not), and as a sign of the possessive, singular and plural; as, a boy`s hat, boys` hats. In the latter use it originally marked the omission of the letter e. • (n.) A figure of speech by which the orator or writer suddenly breaks off from th
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/apostrophe/

apostrophe

a rhetorical device by which a speaker turns from the audience as a whole to address a single person or thing. For example, in William Shakespeare`s ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/89

apostrophe

an address to a dead or absent person or personification as if he or she were present.
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

apostrophe

  1. address to an absent or imaginary person
  2. the mark (') used to indicate the omission of one or more letters from a printed word

Found on

apostrophe

apostrophe, figure of speech in which an absent person, a personified inanimate being, or an abstraction is addressed as though present. The term is derived from a Greek word meaning “a turning away,” and this sense is maintained when a narrative or dramatic thread is broken in order to ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0804385.html

apostrophe

apostrophe: see punctuation; abbreviation.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0910340.html

Apostrophe

The apostrophe is a rhetorical figure by which the orator changes the course of his speech, and makes a short impassioned address to one absent as if he were present, or to things without life and sense as if they had life and sense. The same term is also applied to a comma when used to contract a word, or to mark the possessive case, as in 'John's
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AA1.HTM

apostrophe

(grammar) Punctuation mark (') used in written English and some other languages. In English it serves primarily to indicate either a missing letter (mustn't for must not) or number ('47 for 1947), or gramma...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006012.html

apostrophe

Punctuation mark indicating possession (Bob's car) or representing letters that have been removed (wouldn't, isn't).
Found on http://quick-facts.co.uk/language/grammar.html

Apostrophe

Not to be confused with the punctuation mark, apostrophe is the act of addressing some abstraction o
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Apostrophe

An address to a dead or absent person or personification as if he or she were present.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

apostrophe

addressing of a personified thing rhetorically
Found on http://phrontistery.info/a.html
No exact match found