Anticline

In structural geology, an anticline is a fold that is convex up and has its oldest beds at its core. The term is not to be confused with antiform, which is a purely descriptive term for any fold that is convex up. Therefore if age relationships between various strata are unknown, the term antiform must be used. On a geologic map, anticlines are us
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anticline

anticline

A fold of rock layers that is convex upwards. Antonym of syncline.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

Anticline

A geological formation described usually as a dome or inverted saucer. Such a structure would be an anticline with 'four way dip closure'. However, not all anticlines are this 'perfect' shape. If covered by an impermeable layer of rock the anticline would make a potential oil or gas reservoir.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

anticline

an arched, inverted-trough configuration of folded and stratified rock layers. Compare syncline.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Anticline

An'ti·cline noun [ See Anticlinal .] (Geol.) A structure of bedded rocks in which the beds on both sides of an axis or axial plane dip away from the axis; an anticlinal.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/A/95

Anticline

• (n.) A structure of bedded rocks in which the beds on both sides of an axis or axial plane dip away from the axis; an anticlinal.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/anticline/

anticline

(from the article `petroleum`) Traps can be formed in many ways (Figure 1). Those formed by tectonic events, such as folding or faulting of rock units, are called structural traps. ... An anticline is a fold that is convex upward, and a syncline is a fold that is concave upward (Figure 2). An anticlinorium is a large anticline on ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/a/82

Anticline

an arched fold in which the layers usually dip away from the axis.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_geology

Anticline

A fold in rock layers that forms an arch.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/a.html

Anticline

An upward fold or arch of rock strata.
Found on http://www.coaleducation.org/glossary.htm

Anticline

An arched fold, usually in the shape of an inverted U.
Found on http://www.desertusa.com/glossary2.html

anticline

anticline: see fold.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0910308.html

anticline

In geology, rock layers or beds folded to form a convex arch (seldom preserved intact) in which older rocks comprise the core. Where relative ages of the rock layers, or stratigraphic ages, are not known, convex upward folded rocks are referred to as antiforms. The fold of an anticline may be undulating or steeply curved. A steplike bend in otherwi
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0016259.html

ANTICLINE

A convex upward rock fold in which strata have been bent into an arch; the strata on each side of the core of the arch are inclined in opposite directions away from the axis or crest; the core contains older rocks than does the perimeter of the structure.
Found on http://www.isgs.illinois.edu/glossary.shtml

anticline

An upward fold in the crust
Found on http://www.quick-facts.co.uk/earth/glossary.html

anticline

A convex fold in rock, the central part of which contains the oldest section of rock. See also syncline.
Found on http://www.inlandlapidary.com/user_area/glossaryA.asp

anticline

A fold that is convex upward, or that had such an attitude at some stage of its development. compare syncline .
Found on http://www.ge-at.iastate.edu/glossary-of-geologic-terms/

anticline

A fold of rock layers with a convex shape pointing upwards. Antonym of syncline.
Found on http://www.scientificpsychic.com/etc/geology-glossary.html

Anticline

Upwardly arched folds of Sedimentary rocks put under pressure by movement in the Earth. (See syncline)
Found on http://www.bgs.ac.uk/discoveringGeology/glossary.html

Anticline

A fold in which the limbs dip away from the axis. After erosion, the oldest rocks are exposed in the central core of the fold.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html
No exact match found