Absorption

[skin] Skin absorption is a route by which substances can enter the body through the skin. Along with inhalation, ingestion and injection, dermal absorption is a route of exposure for toxic substances and route of administration for medication. Absorption of substances through the skin depends on a number of factors, the most important of w
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorption_(skin)

Absorption

[pharmacokinetics] In pharmacology (and more specifically pharmacokinetics), absorption is the movement of a drug into the bloodstream. Absorption involves several phases. First, the drug needs to be introduced via some route of administration (oral, via the skin, etc.) and in a specific dosage form such as a tablet, capsule, and so on. In
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorption_(pharmacokinetics)

Absorption

[acoustics] Acoustic absorption is that property of any material that changes the acoustic energy of sound waves into another form, often heat, which it to some extent retains, as opposed to that sound energy that material reflects or conducts. Acoustic absorption is represented by the symbol A in calculations. Absorption is not a single me
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorption_(acoustics)

Absorption

[electromagnetic radiation] In physics, absorption of electromagnetic radiation is the way by which the energy of a photon is taken up by matter, typically the electrons of an atom. Thus, the electromagnetic energy is transformed to other forms of energy for example, to heat. The absorption of light during wave propagation is often called a
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorption_(electromagnetic_radiation)

Absorption

[chemistry] Absorption, in chemistry, is a physical or chemical phenomenon or a process in which atoms, molecules, or ions enter some bulk phase - gas, liquid, or solid material. This is a different process from adsorption, since molecules undergoing absorption are taken up by the volume, not by the surface (as in the case for adsorption).
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorption_(chemistry)

absorption

The taking in of water and dissolved minerals and nutrients across cell membranes. Contrast with ingestion.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5ecol.html

Absorption

Not to be confused with adsorption, absorption is one substance is taken up into the interior of another - adsorption with a 'd' is entirely a surface effect. Examples are the swelling of a poly(acrylamide) polymer with aqueous solution (in a disposable nappy) or the dissolution of carbon dioxide in seawater (one of the possible antidotes to global
Found on http://www.kcpc.usyd.edu.au/discovery/glossary-all.html

Absorption

The uptake of water , other fluids, or dissolved chemicals by a cell or an organism (as tree roots absorb dissolved nutrients in soil.)
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Absorption

1) A material's capability to dampen sound. 2) The process of a material dampening or 'absorbing' sound.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Absorption

The penetration of a substance, eg. gas or thin film of liquid, into the surface layer of a solid with which it is in contact eg. process by which pesticides are taken into plant tissues by roots or foliage (stomata, cuticle, etc.).
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Absorption

With respect to Radiation Protection , absorption describes a mode by which Radioactive materials may enter the body leading to an Internal Radiation hazard. For example it is well known that H-3 contamination on the skin can readily be absorbed and taken up by the body water.
Found on http://www.ionactive.co.uk/glossary.html

absorption

[n] - (physics) the process in which incident radiated energy is retained without reflection or transmission on passing through a medium 2. [n] - (chemistry) a process in which one substance permeates another
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=absorption

Absorption

Short for the term Acoustical Absorption (quality of a surface or substance to take in, not reflect, a sound wave).
Found on http://www.testing1212.co.uk/a.htm

Absorption

is the assimilation of molecules, or other particles, into the physical structure of a liquid or solid, without chemical reaction.
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absorption

the process of sucking up; taking in and making part of an existing whole. Compare adsorption.
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Absorption

Transformation of radiant energy to a different form of energy by the interaction of matter, depending on temperature and wavelength. See also: Absorb, Absorption Coefficient, Extinction.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/a/b/absorption/source.html

Absorption

In chemistry absorption can mean two things: Firstly it can imply that powerful forces exist holding two substances together, and that seperation of the two is not easily accomplished. Secondly it can mean absorption of heat, light etc.. . The absorption of ultraviolet, visible and infrared radiation is the basis of some forms of spectrometry which
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

absorption

absorb; absorbent. Compare with adsorption and sorption. 1. Penetration of molecules into the bulk of a solid or liquid, forming either a solution or compound. Absorption can be a chemical process (a strong solution of NaOH absorbs CO2 from the air) or a physical process (palladium absorbs hydrogen gas). 2. Capture and transformation of
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/a.shtml

Absorption

In chemistry absorption can mean two things: Firstly it can imply that powerful forces exist holding two substances together, and that seperation of the two is not easily accomplished. Secondly it can mean absorption of heat, light etc.. . The absorption
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/82-Absorption

Absorption

The entry of a drug substance into the bloodstream from the site of administration.
Found on http://www.vernalis.com/component/content/article/101-placing-and-open-offe

absorption

A process in which Quid molecules are taken up by a liquid or solid and distributed throughout the body of that liquid or solid. Compare with adsorption.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20742

Absorption

1) A mechanical phenomenon wherein one substance penetrates into the inner structure of another, as in absorbent cotton or a sponge. 2) An optical phenomenon wherein atoms or molecules block or attenuate the transmission of a beam of electromagnetic radiation
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20747

Absorption

A process in which one substance, usually a liquid or gas, is taken into the body of another.
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Absorption

Absorption: Uptake. In the biomedical sciences, absorption has diverse specific meanings. In the body, absorption is the process whereby a cell, tissue or organ takes up a substance. In the intestinal tract, absorption is the uptake of food (or other substances) from the digestive tract. In radiology, absorption refers to the taking up of energy by
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2101

Absorption

Occurs when light is partially or completely absorbed by a surface, converting its energy to heat.
Found on http://www.rodsmith.org.uk/photographic%20glossary/rods%20photographic%20gl
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