whole

[adj] - (of siblings) having the same parents 2. [adj] - including all components without exception 3. [n] - all of something including all its component elements or parts 4. [n] - an assemblage of parts that is regarded as a single entity
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=whole

Whole

• (a.) Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; not broken or fractured; unimpaired; uninjured; integral; as, a whole orange; the egg is whole; the vessel is whole. • (n.) A regular combination of parts; a system. • (a.) Possessing, or being in a state of, heath and soundness; healthy; sound; well. • (a.) Containing the tot...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/whole/

whole

adjective including all components without exception; being one unit or constituting the full amount or extent or duration; complete; `gave his whole attention`; `a whole wardrobe for the tropics`; `the whole hog`; `a whole week`; `the baby cried the whole tri...
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Whole

Whole adjective [ Middle English hole , hol , hal , hool , Anglo-Saxon hāl well, sound, healthy; akin to OFries. & Old Saxon h...l , Dutch heel , German heil , Icelandic heill , Swedish hel whole, Danish heel , Go...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/35

Whole

Whole noun 1. The entire thing; the entire assemblage of parts; totality; all of a thing, without defect or exception; a thing complete in itself. « 'This not the whole of life to live, Nor all of death to die.» J. Montgomery. 2. A regular combination of par...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/35

whole

1. Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire; as, the whole earth; the whole solar system; the whole army; the whole nation. 'On their whole host I flew unarmed.' 'The whole race of mankind.' (Shak) ... 2. Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; not broken or fractured; unimp...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Whole

A male or female that has not been spayed or neutered.
Found on http://www.cat-world.com.au/glossary

whole

including all components without exception
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206

Whole

The term 'whole' has been used frequently in attempts to describe or to explain certain features of biological, psychological, or sociological (but sometimes also of physical and chemical) phenomena which were said to be inaccessible to a 'merely mechanistic' or 'summative' analysis. In fact, most applications of the concept of whole explicitly re....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/w.html
No exact match found