turquoise

Blue-green gemstone widely used, cut en cabochon (see jewel cutting), in 19thC jewellery. Turquoise probably takes its name from the French for Turkey, from where it first reached Europe. The bluer the colour the more prized the gem - the best-quality stones come from north-east Iran.

Turquoise

The Turquoise was a French Saphir Class minelayer submarine of 669 tons displacement surfaced launched in 1929. The Turquoise was powered by Vickers-Normand 4-cycle diesel engines providing a top speed of 12 knots surfaced and 9 knots submerged and a range of 4000 km surfaced. She carried a complement of 40 and armaments consisted of one 3-inch ant...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RT.HTM

turquoise

greenish-blue precious stone 
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turquoise

[n] - a blue to gray green mineral consisting of copper aluminum phosphate
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=turquoise

turquoise

noun a blue to grey green mineral consisting of copper aluminum phosphate; `blue turquoise is valued as a gemstone`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=turquoise

Turquoise

• (n.) Alt. of Turquois • (a.) Having a fine light blue color, like that of choice mineral turquoise.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/turquoise/

turquoise

hydrated copper and aluminum phosphate [CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)84H2O] that is extensively used as a gemstone. It is a secondary mineral deposited from ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/95

turquoise

turquoise, hydrous phosphate of aluminum and copper, Al2(OH)3PO4·H2O+Cu, used as a gem. It occurs rarely in crystal form, but is usually cryptocrystalline. Turquoise is opaque and has a waxy luster; the color varies from greenish gray to sky-blue. The sky-blue varieties are the most valued as...
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Turquoise

Turquoise (also known as calaite) is a mineral of secondary origin usually found in small veins and stringers. Turquoise is a hydrous phosphate of alumina containing a little copper. It has a blue, or bluish green, colour, and usually occurs in reniform masses with a botryoidal surface. It has a relative hardness of 6. Turquoise is susceptible of a...
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turquoise

Mineral, hydrous basic copper aluminium phosphate, CuAl6(PO4)4(OH)85H2 O. Blue-green, blue, or green, it is a gemstone. Turquoise is found in Australia, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Iran, Turkestan, Mexico, and southwestern US...
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Turquoise

[disambiguation] Turquoise is a gemstone. Turquoise may also refer to: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turquoise_(disambiguation)

Turquoise

[trading platform] Turquoise is an equities and derivatives trading platform (Multilateral trading facility or MTF), created by nine major investment banks in 2008. The aim was to provide dealing services at a 50% discount to traditional exchanges. It is a hybrid system that allows trading both on and off traditional exchanges. The system w...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turquoise_(trading_platform)

Turquoise

[song] `Turquoise` is a song written and recorded by British singer-songwriter Donovan. The `Turquoise` single was released in the United Kingdom on October 30, 1965 through Pye Records (Pye 7N 15984) and charted, peaking at No.30. The `Turquoise` single was backed with `Hey Gyp (Dig the Slowness)` and only released in the United Kingdom. `...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turquoise_(song)

Turquoise

[color] Turquoise z or z is the name of a greenish blue color, based on the gem of the same name. The word turquoise comes from the French for Turkish, as the gem was originally imported from Turkey. The first recorded use of turquoise as a color name in English was in 1573. At right is displayed the X11 color named turquoise. ==Turquoise g...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turquoise_(color)

Turquoise

The substance has been known by many names, but the word turquoise, which dates to the 16th century, is derived from an Old French word for `Turkish`, because the mineral was first brought to Europe from Turkey, from the mines in historical Khorasan Province of Iran. Pliny the Elder referred to the mineral as callais, the Iranians named it `phi......
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turquoise

Turquoise

Turquoise is a semi-precious gemstone found in desert regions throughout the world. All the cultures use it--Mongolian, Chinese, Native Australian, Persian & Southwestern Native American. It is considered a source of good fortune and beauty. If you see brown or grey streaks in turquoise, they are caused bythe matrix, or mothe...
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turquoise

A semiprecious gemstone of bluish-green colour that is made of a copper and aluminium compound with a high water content. Turquoise is named after Turkey, where it was thought to have been discovered. Turquoise has a hardness of 6 on the Mohs Scale
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Turquoise

Turquoise is a precious mineral with an opaque blue green colour that in its finest form is quite rare and sort after. It has been used since Egyptian times and was named after the French word which literally means Turkish as they were the first people to bring it to Europe in great numbers in the 16th century.
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turquoise

blue-green
Found on http://phrontistery.info/t.html

Turquoise

[horse] Turquoise (1825–1846) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and broodmare who won the classic Oaks Stakes at Epsom Downs Racecourse in 1828. In a racing career which lasted from April 1828 until April 1830 she ran eighteen times, winning eleven races and finishing second on five occasions. As a three-year-old in 1828 she failed to ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turquoise_(horse)

turquoise

(color) turquesa
Found on http://www.aleida.net/gloss3-en.html
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