traction

(from the article `bone disease`) Traction counteracts muscle pull on the skeleton and is used to reduce and stabilize fractures and to prevent muscle shortening. Traction is applied ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/69

traction

(from the article `railroad`) Diesel-electric locomotives appeared in the 1920s. Individual locomotive units provided up to 5,000 horsepower, a figure equal to all the ... In the first half of the 20th century, advances in railroad technology and operating practice were limited. One of the most far-reaching was the ... [2 related art...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/69

traction

(trak´shәn) the exertion of a pulling force, such as along the long axis of something. It may be applied to a fractured bone or dislocated joint to maintain proper position and facilitate healing, or, in obstetrics, along the axis of the pelvis to aid in delivery when the fetus is in a difficult position.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

traction

[n] - (orthopedics) the act of pulling on a bone or limb (as in a fracture) to relieve pressure or align parts in a special way during healing
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=traction

Traction

• (n.) The adhesive friction of a wheel on a rail, a rope on a pulley, or the like. • (n.) Attraction; a drawing toward. • (n.) The act of drawing, or the state of being drawn; as, the traction of a muscle. • (n.) Specifically, the act of drawing a body along a plane by motive power, as the drawing of a carriage by men or horses...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/traction/

traction

<dentistry> The act of drawing or pulling the teeth. ... (08 Jan 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

traction

noun (orthopedics) the act of pulling on a bone or limb (as in a fracture) to relieve pressure or align parts in a special way during healing; `his leg was in traction for several days`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=traction

Traction

(load) rolling and sliding of gravel, pebbles and boulders along a river bed (sometimes sea-bed) by flowing water.
Found on https://www.geolsoc.org.uk/ks3/gsl/education/resources/rockcycle/page3451.h

Traction

[agency] Traction is an interactive advertising agency based in San Francisco. Their clients include Alibaba.com, Adobe Systems, Bank of America, Cabot Creamery, California Bank & Trust, Camelbak, Intuit, Intel, Kelly-Moore Paints, Livescribe, Meebo, Robert Half International, Salesforce.com, SAP, and Shutterfly, Walmart, ZoneAlarm. ==Histo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traction_(agency)

Traction

[engineering] Traction, or tractive force, is the force used to generate motion between a body and a tangential surface, most generally through the use of dry friction, though the use of shear force of the surface is also commonly used. Traction can also refer to the maximum tractive force between a body and a surface, as limited by availab...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traction_(engineering)

Traction

[geology] Traction is the geologic process whereby a current transports sand grains and larger clasts by rolling or sliding along the bottom. Thus, the grains and clasts interact with the substratum during transport. By contrast, saltation, a related sediment transport process, moves grains across the bottom by bouncing or hopping. The actu...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traction_(geology)

Traction

[Interactive Advertising Agency] ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traction_(Interactive_Advertising_Agency)

Traction

[organization] Traction is a progressive non-profit organization promoting civic engagement, based in the city of Durham, North Carolina. Traction`s goal is to inform, inspire and connect a growing social network of left-leaning 20- and 30-somethings. The organization focuses on raising awareness of progressive issues including civil rights...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traction_(organization)

Traction

[orthopedics] In orthopedic medicine, traction refers to the set of mechanisms for straightening broken bones or relieving pressure on the spine and skeletal system. There are two types of traction: skin traction and skeletal traction. ==Modern techniques== Traction procedures are largely replaced now by more modern techniques, but certain ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traction_(orthopedics)

Traction

A sustained mechanical pull to a limb to correct a dislocation or broken bone
Found on http://www.childrenshospital.org/centers-and-services/centers/orthopedic-ce

Traction

Ability of a shoe to provide a sure grip on the surface for which it was designed.
Found on http://www.pinzashoes.com/

Traction

Drawing or pulling of limb as part of treatment.
Found on http://www.orthoexperts.co.uk/solicitors/medical-glossary.html

Traction

Erosional movement of particles by rolling, sliding and shuffling along the eroded surface. Occurs in all erosional mediums (air, water, and ice).
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/t.html

TRACTION

In oils, the movement of one paint layer over another.
Found on http://www.rexart.com/glossary.html

Traction

One of two methods by which an elevator is moved, whereby the elevator is 'pulled' up by cables; traction refers to the friction developed between the hoist ropes and drive sheave
Found on http://www.thyssenkruppelevator.com/glossary.html

Traction

The amount of friction between the tyre and the ground.
Found on http://www.expertasig.ro/dictionar/car_terms.php

Traction

The degree to which a car is able to transfer its power onto the track surface for forward progress.
Found on http://www.formula1.com/inside_f1/glossary.html

Traction

The drawing or pulling of a limb or the spine.
Found on http://www.gadsbywicks.co.uk/uploaded/3822.pdf

Traction

the use of tension to hold a body part in place or to correct or prevent an alignment problem
Found on http://www.medichecks.com/glossary.cfm?ltr=T

Traction

Traction is a non-surgical treatment option for broken or incorrectly positioned bones, e.g., the spine. It involves putting a steady pulling force onto the spinal column (backbone) in order to correct the position of misaligned bones of spine, and to hold them in place while healing takes place.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20560
No exact match found