Tort

A wrongful act or an infringement of a right (other than under contract) leading to legal liability. It can be intentional or from carelessness (called 'negligence').

tort

[n] - (law) any wrongdoing for which and action for damages may be brought
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=tort

Tort

A civil wrong for which the remedy is a common law action for unliquidated damages, and which is not exclusively the breach of a contract or the breach of a trust or other merely equitable obligation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

tort

In law, a wrongful act for which someone can be sued for damages in a civil court. It includes such acts as libel, trespass, injury done to someone (whether intentionally or by negligence), and...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Tort

A civil wrong committed against a person for which compensation may be sought through a civil Court, eg personal injury, negligent driving or libel.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20760

Tort

An action in tort is a claim for damages to compensate the claimant for harm suffered. Such claims arise from cases of personal injury, breach of contract and damage to personal reputation. As well as damages, remedies include an injunction to prevent harm occurring again
Found on http://www.hmcourts-service.gov.uk/infoabout/glossary/legal.htm

Tort

A breach of a duty imposed by law (rather than by contract) which gives a right of action for damages.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20912

Tort

A civil wrong, the victim of which is entitled to redress in the civil courts
Found on http://www.elc.org.uk/pages/lawlegalglossary.htm

Tort

A civil wrong, which can be independent of contract e.g. libel
Found on http://www.jisclegal.ac.uk/Projects/TransferandUseofBibliographicRecords/Th

Tort

A civil wrong independent of contract that gives rise to a claim in damages.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20921

Tort

Tort noun [ French, from Late Latin tortum , from Latin tortus twisted, crooked, past participle of torqure to twist, bend. See Torture .] 1. Mischief; injury; calamity. [ Obsolete] « That had them long opprest with tort Spenser. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/73

Tort

Tort adjective Stretched tight; taut. [ R.] « Yet holds he them with tortest rein.» Emerson.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/73

tort

civil wrong noun (law) any wrongdoing for which an action for damages may be brought
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=tort

Tort

• (a.) Stretched tight; taut. • (n.) Mischief; injury; calamity. • (n.) Any civil wrong or injury; a wrongful act (not involving a breach of contract) for which an action will lie; a form of action, in some parts of the United States, for a wrong or injury.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/tort/

tort

in common law, any instance of harmful behaviour, from physical attack on one`s person to interference with one`s goods or use and enjoyment of one`s ... [10 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/64

TORT

A wrong; a private or civil wrong or injury resulting from a breach of a legal duty that exists by virtue of society's expectations regarding interpersonal conduct, rather than by contract or other private relationship.
Found on http://www.glossarycentral.com/legal/tort.html

tort

tort, in law, the violation of some duty clearly set by law, not by a specific agreement between two parties, as in breach of contract. When such a duty is breached, the injured party has the right to institute suit for compensatory damages. Certain torts, such as nuisance, may be suppressed by inju...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0849114.html

Tort

A negligent or intentional civil wrong not arising out of a contract or statute. These include "intentional torts" such as battery or defamation, and torts for negligence. A tort is an act that injures someone in some way, and for which the injured person may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Legally, torts are called civil wrongs, as opposed to cri.....
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/t032.htm

Tort

Derived from the french word ' wrong' , it means a civil wrong or wrongful act.Torts include injuries made by a person to another for which he is legally responsible.It can be either intentonal or accidental.In most cases the injury caused is likely to be physical but that is not the requirement it can also be mental distress.It relates to somethin...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

tort

n. from French for "wrong," a civil wrong or wrongful act, whether intentional or accidental, from which injury occurs to another. Torts include all negligence cases as well as intentional wrongs which result in harm. Therefore tort law is one of the major areas of law (along with contract, real property and criminal law) and results in more civil ...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=2137

Tort

Tort is an English legal term for a civil wrong which violates a general duty and not merely a breach of contract arising out of a particular relationship between the parties. But a tort may also be a breach of contract and a crime. It may relate either to persons or to property.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AT.HTM

tort

In law, a wrongful act for which someone can be sued for damages in a civil court. It includes such acts as libel, trespass, injury done to someone (whether intentionally or by negligence), and inducement to break a contract (although breach of contract itself is not a tort). In general a tort is distinguished from a crime in that it affects the in...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0007157.html

Tort

A civil wrong committed against a person for which compensation may be sought through a civil court, eg personal injury, negligent driving or libel.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21527

Tort

A tort, in common law jurisdictions, is a civil wrong that unfairly causes someone else to suffer loss or harm resulting in legal liability for the person who commits the tortious act, called a tortfeasor. Although crimes may be torts, the cause of legal action is not necessarily a crime, as the harm may be due to negligence which does not amount ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tort

tort

An act, such as libel and trespass, for which one can be sued in a civil court.
Found on http://www.quick-facts.co.uk/politics/legalterms.html
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