time

The Roman based the time of the day on their observation of the sun and the shadows it created. The device that helped them divide up the day into hours according to the season was the sundial. In 264 BC the first Greek sundial (horologium) was brought to Rome from Greek Sicily and set up in the Forum. On cloudy days and in the dark, the Greek wate…...

Time

Begins when a team gains possession of the ball.
Found on http://www.lacrosse2.com/glossary.shtml

time

Type: Term Definitions: 1. chronophobia.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=68316

Time

Is the element which quantifies investment horizons, time remaining to maturity, time remaining to expiration, or time of holding period. It measures the distance between chronological points.
Found on http://www.oasismanagement.com/glossary/

Time

In Radiation Protection 'time' is still considered one of the key principles for protection from External Radiation sources of Ionising Radiation . For a given Dose Rate , the exposure from the source can be minimised by minimising the time spent near the source. Whilst this concept is still valid, and in some circumstances its vital, it is usually...
Found on http://www.ionactive.co.uk/glossary.html

time

[n] - a period of time considered as a resource under your control and sufficient to accomplish something 2. [n] - a suitable moment 3. [n] - an indefinite period (usually marked by specific attributes or activities) 4. [n] - an instance or single occasion for some event 5. [n] - a person`s experience on a particular occasion...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=time

Time

1. clock time: accurately measurable objective time, based on the diurnal cycle of 24 hours; 2. subjective time: inner experiential time, which can stretch and contract with changing energy-weather or states of consciousness.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20417

Time

Time Protocol (RFC 868 - http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc868.html) provides a machine-readable date and time. It can be either TCP or UDP on port 37. Date and time are sent as a 32-bit binary number
Found on http://www.archivemag.co.uk/

Time

archaic or obsolete terms > Herbs & Plants: Thyme
Found on http://www.skyscript.co.uk/glossarytt.html

Time

Time is used to specify an instant (time of the day) or as a measure of time interval. NB - The words time or timing, when used to describe Synchronisation networks, usually refer to the frequency signals used for Synchronisation or measurement.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20678

Time

The SI unit of TimeThe SI unit of time is the second and is the duration of 9192631770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between two hyperfine levels of the ground state of a caesium 133 atom.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/t/i/time/source.html

TIME

Toolkit of Instruments to Measure End-of-Life Care
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20895

Time

Time noun ; plural Times . [ Middle English time , Anglo-Saxon tīma , akin to tīd time, and to Icelandic tīmi , Danish time an hour, Swedish timme . √58. See Tide , noun ] 1. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/58

Time

Time transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Timed ; present participle & verbal noun Timing .] 1. To appoint the time for; to bring, begin, or perform at the proper season or time; as, he timed his appearance rightly...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/58

Time

Time intransitive verb 1. To keep or beat time; to proceed or move in time. « With oar strokes timing to their song.» Whittier. 2. To pass time; to delay. [ Obsolete]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/58

time

1. Duration, considered independently of any system of measurement or any employment of terms which designate limited portions thereof. 'The time wasteth [i. E. Passes away] night and day.' (Chaucer) 'I know of no ideas . . . That have a better claim to be accounted simple and original than those of space and time.' (Reid) ... 2. A particular perio...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

time

clip noun an instance or single occasion for some event; `this time he succeeded`; `he called four times`; `he could do ten at a clip`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=time

time

(tīm) a measure of duration. See under adjectives for specific times, such as bleeding time.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Time

• (v. i.) To keep or beat time; to proceed or move in time. • (n.) Hour of travail, delivery, or parturition. • (n.) Performance or occurrence of an action or event, considered with reference to repetition; addition of a number to itself; repetition; as, to double cloth four times; four times four, or sixteen. • (n.) The duratio...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/time/

Time

major American weekly newsmagazine that is published in New York City. Time was the creation of two young journalists, Henry R. Luce and Briton ... [7 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/51

time

a measured or measurable period, a continuum that lacks spatial dimensions. Time is of philosophical interest and is also the subject of mathematical ... [45 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/51

time

time 1. A nonspatial continuum in which events occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future. 2. An interval separating two points on this continuum; a duration: a long time since the last war; passed the time reading. 3. A number, as of years, days, or minutes, representing such an interval. 4. An in...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2946/

TIME

[command] In computing, TIME is a command in DOS, OS/2 and Windows that is used to display and set the current system time of the operating system. This command is available in command line interpreters (shells) such as COMMAND.COM, CMD.EXE, 4DOS, 4OS2 and 4NT. In Unix, the date command displays and sets both the time and date, in a similar...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TIME_(command)

Time

In music, time is the measurement based on the periodicity of the accents, and classified according to the subdivision of the beats. It is not the same as tempo. The instinctive desire for rhythm and proportion, which is as evident in music as it is in verse, gives rise to regularity of accent. If the accent occurs on every other beat, the time is ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VT.HTM

Time

Measurable period in which cause and effect occurs and systems function.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/t.html
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