Tellurium

Tellurium is a chemical element with symbol Te and atomic number 52. A brittle, mildly toxic, rare, silver-white metalloid which looks similar to tin, tellurium is chemically related to selenium and sulfur. It is occasionally found in native form, as elemental crystals. Tellurium is far more common in the universe as a whole than it is on Earth. I...
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tellurium

(Te) (tә-lu´re-әm) a chemical element, atomic number 52, atomic weight 127.60.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

tellurium

(Te), semimetallic chemical element in the oxygen family (Group VIa of the periodic table), closely allied with the element selenium in chemical and ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/22

tellurium

[n] - a brittle silver-white metalloid element that is related to selenium and sulfur
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Tellurium

• (n.) A rare nonmetallic element, analogous to sulphur and selenium, occasionally found native as a substance of a silver-white metallic luster, but usually combined with metals, as with gold and silver in the mineral sylvanite, with mercury in Coloradoite, etc. Symbol Te. Atomic weight 125.2.
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tellurium

<chemistry> A rare nonmetallic element, analogous to sulphur and selenium, occasionally found native as a substance of a silver-white metallic luster, but usually combined with metals, as with gold and silver in the mineral sylvanite, with mercury in Coloradoite, etc. Symbol Te. Atomic weight 125.2. Graphic tellurium. ... <chemical> Nag...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

tellurium

Te noun a brittle silver-white metalloid element that is related to selenium and sulfur; it is used in alloys and as a semiconductor; occurs mainly as tellurides in ores of copper and nickel and silver and gold
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=tellurium

tellurium

(Te) Type: Term Pronunciation: tel-ū′rē-ŭm Definitions: 1. A rare semimetallic element, atomic no. 52, atomic wt. 127.60, belonging to the sulfur group.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=90033

Tellurium

Tel·lu'ri·um noun [ New Latin , from Latin tellus , -uris , the earth.] (Chemistry) A rare nonmetallic element, analogous to sulphur and selenium, occasionally found native as a substance of a silver-white metallic luster, but usually combined with metals, as with gold and silver i...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/22

tellurium

Silver-white, semi-metallic (metalloid) element, atomic number 52, relative atomic mass 127.60. Chemically it is similar to sulphur and selenium, and it is considered one of the sulphur group. It occurs naturally in telluride minerals, and is used in colouring glass blue-brown, in the electrolytic refining of zinc, in electronics, and a...
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tellurium

tellurium (teloor'ēum) [Lat.,=earth], semimetallic chemical element; symbol Te; at. no. 52; at. wt. 127.60; m.p. 450°C; b.p. 990°C; sp. gr. 6.24 at 20°C; valence -2, +4, or +6. Tellurium is a lustrous, brittle, crystalline, silver-white metalloid. A powdery brown form of the el...
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Tellurium

Tellurium is a greyish-white semi-metallic element with a metallic lustre and the symbol Te. A semiconductor, it shows greater conductivity in certain directions, according to the alignment of the atoms. Tellurium is found in small quantities in its native state, but usually combined with metals such as tetradymite or bismuth telluride. Tellurium w...
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Tellurium

Tellurium is a rare, silvery-white, semi-metallic element which exhibits both metallic and non-metallic traits and has an abundance of 0.005 ppm in the earth`s crust. It exists in only one form, whereas the other members of the oxygen group of elements in the periodic table all exhibit at least two allotropic forms. It is generally found in combina...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/t/e/tellerium/source.html
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