Steeple

A steeple, in architecture, is a tall tower on a building, topped by a spire and often incorporating a belfry and other components. Steeples are very common on Christian churches and cathedrals and the use of the term generally connotes a religious structure. They may be stand-alone structures, or incorporated into the entrance or center of the bu...
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steeple

[n] - a tall tower that forms the superstructure of a building (usually a church or temple) and that tapers to a point at the top
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Steeple

• (n.) A spire; also, the tower and spire taken together; the whole of a structure if the roof is of spire form. See Spire.
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steeple

spire noun a tall tower that forms the superstructure of a building (usually a church or temple) and that tapers to a point at the top
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=steeple

Steeple

Stee'ple noun [ Middle English stepel , Anglo-Saxon stēpel , st...pel ; akin to English steep , adjective ] (Architecture) A spire; also, the tower and spire taken together; the whole of a structure if the roof is of spire form. See Spire . 'A weatherco...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/191

steeple

A spire; also, the tower and spire taken together; the whole of a structure if the roof is of spire form. See Spire. 'A weathercock on a steeple.' Rood steeple. See Rood tower, under Rood. ... <botany> Steeple bush, a low shrub (Spiraea tomentosa) having dense panicles of minute rose-coloured flowers; hardhack. Steeple chase, a race across co...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Steeple

In architecture, a steeple is an appendage erected, generally on the western end of a church, to hold the bells. Steeples are of two varieties: spires and towers. A spire continually diminishes as it ascends, either in a cone or pyramid shape, while a tower remains fairly constant in its width and is covered by a flat platform or roof.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TS.HTM

steeple

In architecture, a term applied to a tall tower, usually including its spire; especially applied to the spired towers of Christopher Wren's City churches in London. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Steeple

Often used as an equivalent term to spire, but also specifically used as part of the term 'crown steeple', and to refer to the classically-inspired vertical features built from the mid-18th to the mid-19th century. Related Words: Classical; Crown steeple; Spire, spirelet
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20938

steeple

tall ornamental tower, sometimes a belfry, usually attached to an ecclesiastical or public building. The steeple is usually composed of a series of ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/157
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