span

  1. the complete duration of something
  2. the distance or interval between two points
  3. two items of the same kind
  4. a unit of length based on the width of the expanded human hand (usually taken as 9 inches)
  5. a structure that allows people or vehicles to cross an obstacle such as a river or canal or railway etc.
  6. the act of sitting or standing astride
...

span

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Bridges) The unsupported length of a bridge, between its towers or piers.

Span

The horizontal distance between structural supports such as walls, columns, piers, beams, girders, and trusses.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

span

(from the article `bridge`) ...holding up a beam—yet the engineering problems that must be overcome even in this simple form are inherent in every bridge: the supports must be ... ...bridge in the United States is Dames Point Bridge (1987), designed by Howard Needles in consultation with Ulrich Finsterwalder and crossing the ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/135

span

[n] - the complete duration of something 2. [n] - a unit of length based on the width of the expanded human hand (usually taken as 9 inches) 3. [n] - the distance or interval between two points
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=span

Span

• (v. t.) Hence, a small space or a brief portion of time. • (v. t.) The spread or extent of an arch between its abutments, or of a beam, girder, truss, roof, bridge, or the like, between its supports. • (v. t.) A pair of horses or other animals driven together; usually, such a pair of horses when similar in color, form, and action. ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/span/

span

noun the distance or interval between two points
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=span

Span

[architecture] Note that the maximum bending moment and deflection occur midway between the two supports. From this it follows that if the span is doubled, the maximum moment (and with it the stress) will quadruple, and deflection will increase by a factor of sixteen. For long-distance rope spans, used as power line, antenna or for aerial t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Span_(architecture)

Span

[category theory] In category theory, a span, roof or correspondence is a generalization of the notion of relation between two objects of a category. When the category has all pullbacks (and satisfies a small number of other conditions), spans can be considered as morphisms in a category of fractions. That is, let Λ be the category (-1 ←...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Span_(category_theory)

Span

[programming language] Span is a programming language targeting the Parrot virtual machine. Its syntax is meant to be very similar to C, but its philosophy is Smalltalk-like, and it uses Smalltalk-style message syntax. Almost all of Span`s library visible to the user is written in Span itself. Span is dynamically typed. The hello world prog...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Span_(programming_language)

Span

[unit] A span is the distance measured by a human hand, from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the middle finger. In ancient times, a span was considered to be half a cubit. Sometimes the distinction is made between the great span (thumb to little finger) and little span (index finger to little finger). ==History== Ancient Greek texts show...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Span_(unit)

Span

Span intransitive verb To be matched, as horses. [ U. S.]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/153

Span

Span noun [ Anglo-Saxon spann ; akin to Dutch span , Old High German spanna , German spanne , Icelandic spönn . √170. See Span , transitive verb ] 1. The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extend...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/153

Span

Span transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Spanned ; present participle & verbal noun Spanning .] [ Anglo-Saxon pannan ; akin to D. & German spannen , Old High German spannan , Swedish spänna , Danis...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/153

Span

Span archaic imperfect & past participle of Spin .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/153

span

1. <anatomy> The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom. ... 2. Hence, a small space or a brief portion of time. 'Yet not to earth's contracted span Thy goodness let me bound.' (Pope) 'Life's but a span; I'll every inch enjoy.' (Farquhar) ... 3. The spread or extent of an arch betwe...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Span

1) Refers to the distance between two poles of a transmission or distribution line. 2) The algebraic difference between the upper and lower values of a range.
Found on http://www.youngco.com/young2.asp?ID=4&Type=3

Span

A span is a natural unit of measurement, half a cubit, and measured from the tip of the thumb to the little finger and generally reckoned in England as nine inches or ten inches.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AS.HTM

Span

A term used by the ball driller; generally, it is the distance from the thumb hole to the finger hol
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Bowling/

SPAN

acronym: Space Physics Analysis Network
Found on http://cdiac.ornl.gov/pns/acronyms.html#S

span

algebraic difference between the values of the upper and lower limits of the measuring range
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=311-03-13

Span

Distance between thumb and finger holes.
Found on http://www.bowlersparadise.com/help/glossary.shtml

Span

Distance between two supports
Found on http://www.masoncontractors.org/aboutmasonry/masonryglossary/

Span

distance between vertical face of abutments or supports. See arch. (Illustration)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Span

Horizontal distance covered by a beam or lintel etc
Found on http://www.fmb.org.uk/find-a-builder/helpful-advice/jargon-buster/?locale=e
No exact match found