snare

contrivance, usually of wire or twine, used to entrap an animal; disdained by huntsmen, but much used by poachers. (BG 257)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

snare

(snār) a wire loop for removing polyps and other pedunculated growths by cutting them off at the base.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

snare

[n] - a surgical instrument consisting of wire hoop that can be drawn tight around the base of polyps or small tumors to sever them 2. [n] - strings stretched across the lower head of a snare drum 3. [n] - a trap for birds or small mammals
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=snare

Snare

• (v. t.) To catch with a snare; to insnare; to entangle; hence, to bring into unexpected evil, perplexity, or danger. • (n.) Hence, anything by which one is entangled and brought into trouble. • (n.) A contrivance, often consisting of a noose of cord, or the like, by which a bird or other animal may be entangled and caught; a trap; ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/snare/

snare

verb entice and trap; `The car salesman had snared three potential customers`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=snare

snare

gin 1 noose noun a trap for birds or small mammals; often has a slip noose
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=snare

SNARE

[protein] SNARE (an acronym derived from `SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) REceptor`) proteins are a large protein superfamily consisting of more than 60 members in yeast and mammalian cells. The primary role of SNARE proteins is to mediate vesicle fusion, that is, the exocytosis of cellular transport vesicles with the cell membrane at...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SNARE_(protein)

Snare

[software] Snare (sometimes also written as SNARE, an acronym for System iNtrusion Analysis and Reporting Environment) is a collection of software tools that collect audit log data from a variety of operating systems and applications to facilitate centralised log analysis. Enterprise Agents are available for Linux, OSX,Windows, Solaris, Mic...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snare_(software)

Snare

Snare noun [ Anglo-Saxon snear a cord, a string; akin to Dutch snoer , German schnur , Old High German snour a cord, snarahha a noose, Danish snare , Swedish & Icelandic snara , Goth. sn...rj... a basket; and probably also to English needle...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/131

Snare

Snare transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Snared ; present participle & verbal noun Snaring .] To catch with a snare; to insnare; to entangle; hence, to bring into unexpected evil, perplexity, or danger. « Lest that too hea...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/131

snare

1. A contrivance, often consisting of a noose of cord, or the like, by which a bird or other animal may be entangled and caught; a trap; a gin. ... 2. Hence, anything by which one is entangled and brought into trouble. 'If thou retire, the Dauphin, well appointed, Stands with the snares of war to tangle thee.' (Shak) ... 3. The gut or string stretc...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Snare

1) Short for Snare Drum, the medium size drum directly in front of a sitting drummer which has metal strands drawn across the bottom head which rattle when the drum is hit.
2) The metal (or animal gut) strands stretched across the bottom head of the snare drum.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

snare

contrivance, usually of wire or twine, used to entrap an animal; disdained by huntsmen, but much used by poachers. (BG 257)
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

Snare

Snare is a sheriff's oficer in King Henry IV part II.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/KD.HTM

snare

trap 
Found on http://www.graduateshotline.com/list.html

snare

Type: Term Pronunciation: snār Definitions: 1. An instrument for removing polyps and other projections from a surface, especially within a cavity; it consists of a wire loop passed around the base of the tumor and gradually tightened.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=82596
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