Sign

A sign is an object, quality, event, or entity whose presence or occurrence indicates the probable presence or occurrence of something else. A natural sign bears a causal relation to its object—for instance, thunder is a sign of storm. A conventional sign signifies by agreement, as a full stop signifies the end of a sentence. (This is in contras...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sign

sign

see segno
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_musical_terminology

sign

(from the article `communication`) While signs are usually less germane to the development of words than signals, most of them contain greater amounts of meaning of and by themselves. ... Different forms and levels of the experience of and relationship to reality (both sacred and profane) are linked with the concepts of symbol, sign, .....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/93

sign

(from the article `human disease`) Disease may be acute, chronic, malignant, or benign. Of these terms, chronic and acute have to do with the duration of a disease, malignant and ... Besides symptoms, the diagnostician recognizes signs characteristic of specific diseases. Signs are either structures formed by the pathogen or the ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/93

Sign

(Lat. signum, sign) Logic has been called the science of signs. In psychology that which represents anything to the cognitive faculty. That which signifies or has significance, a symbol. Semasiology or sematology is the science of signs. See Logic, symbolic; Symbolism. For Theory of Signs, see Semiotic. -- J.K.F. Any event of character A whose occ....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/s.html

sign

(sīn) any objective evidence of disease or dysfunction. an observable physical phenomenon so frequently associated with a given condition as to be considered indicative of that condition.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Sign

(Sign / signifier / signified) A sign is anything that creates meaning. Words are an important kind of sign composed of symbols called letters. The brain recognises a word and unconsciously gives it an agreed meaning, but, in fact, the word is merely a symbolic code, one that we learn, mostly during childhood, to 'decode' to find its meaning.â€...
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsn-z.htm

Sign

(v) Sign is the action of affixing his personnel note, name or other marks as a token of his concurrence to the matter contained in the document in which such signature is affixed
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

sign

[n] - (medical) any objective evidence of the presence of a disorder or disease 2. [n] - (linguistics) a fundamental linguistic unit linking a signifier to that which is signified 3. [n] - a gesture that is part of a sign language 4. [n] - a character indicating a relation between quantities 5. [n] - a public display of a (us...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=sign

Sign

• (n.) To affix a signature to; to ratify by hand or seal; to subscribe in one`s own handwriting. • (n.) A motion, an action, or a gesture by which a thought is expressed, or a command or a wish made known. • (v. i.) To be a sign or omen. • (n.) A remarkable event, considered by the ancients as indicating the will of some deity;...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/sign/

sign

<clinical sign> An objective physical finding found by the examiner. ... (27 Sep 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

sign

sign on verb engage by written agreement; `They signed two new pitchers for the next season`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

sign

noun a public display of a (usually written) message; `he posted signs in all the shop windows`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Sign

(Signage) A board, post, or placard that displays written, symbolic, tactile, or pictorial information about the trail or surrounding area. Signage increases safety and comfort on trails. There are five basic types of signs
Found on http://www.americantrails.org/

Sign

[linguistics] the signifier (French signifiant), the `shape` of a word, its phonic component, i.e. the sequence of graphemes (letters), e.g., --, or phonemes (speech sounds), e.g. /kæt/ the signified (French signifié), the ideational component, the concept or object that appears in our minds when we hear or read the signifier e.g. a small...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sign_(linguistics)

Sign

[mathematics] In mathematics, the concept of sign originates from the property of every non-zero real number to be positive or negative. Zero itself is signless, although in some contexts it makes sense to consider a signed zero. Along its application to real numbers, `change of sign` is used throughout mathematics and physics to denote the...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sign_(mathematics)

Sign

[semiotics] In semiotics, a sign is something that can be interpreted as having a meaning, which is something other than itself, and which is therefore able to communicate information to the one interpreting or decoding the sign. Signs can work through any of the senses, visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory or taste, and their meaning can b...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sign_(semiotics)

Sign

Sign intransitive verb 1. To be a sign or omen. [ Obsolete] Shak. 2. To make a sign or signal; to communicate directions or intelligence by signs. 3. To write one's name, esp. as a token of assent, responsibility, or obligation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/100

Sign

Sign noun [ French signe , Latin signum ; confer Anglo-Saxon segen , segn , a sign, standard, banner, also from Latin signum . Confer Ensign , Resign , Seal a stamp, Signal , Signet .] That by which anything is made known or rep...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/100

Sign

Sign transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Signed ; present participle & verbal noun Signing .] [ Middle English seinen to bless, originally, to make the sign of the cross over; in this sense from ASS. segnian (from ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/100

SIGN

A characteristic of a disease; "signs" are seen by observation, while "symptoms" are characteristics reported by the patient; thus, animals exhibit signs of disease, while human beings report symptoms.
Found on http://www.thehorse.com/Glossary.xhtml?L=S

Sign

A fixture or area containing lettering or logos used to advertise a store, goods, or services.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22195

Sign

A sign is a mark drawn upon a surface.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AS.HTM

sign

A sign is an indication that something is not right in the body; defined as things that can be seen by a doctor, nurse or other health care professional; fever, rapid breathing rate and abnormal breathing sounds heard through a stethoscope may be signs of pneumonia
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22236

Sign

A token of anything; a note or token given without words. To sign a judgment, is to enter a judgment for want of something which was required to be done; as, for example, in the English practice, if he who is bound to give oyer does not give it within the time required, in such cases, the adverse party may sign judgment against him. Contracts a...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/s154.htm
No exact match found