Scale

The relationship between actual measurements on a page of plans or blue prints and the actual measurements of the building represented by the plans or blue prints.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

SCALE

This category was created in order to contain articles, sub-categories, and other related stuff about the topic of Russians in Ukraine. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCALE

Scale

- The size of an image, used when defining relationships between images or to change the size of an image.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21026

scale

(1) a reduced or rudimentary leaf, for example around a dormant bud; (2) a flattened epidermal outgrowth, such as those commonly found on the leaves and rhizomes of ferns.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_botanical_terms

scale

(from the article `architecture`) When the proportions of architectural composition are applied to a particular building, the two-termed relationship of the parts to the whole must be ... ...commonly used as compositional centres. The rhythm of a dynamic, flowing line can be achieved by the graduated repetition of a particular shape, .....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/38

scale

(from the article `Bromeliales`) Most bromeliads have very distinctive, complex, multicellular hairs on leaf and inflorescence parts. The architecture of these hairs, or peltate ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/38

scale

(from the article `climate`) Organized wind systems occur in spatial dimensions ranging from tens of metres to thousands of kilometres and possess residence times that vary from ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/38

scale

(from the article `map`) Map scale refers to the size of the representation on the map as compared to the size of the object on the ground. The scale generally used in ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/38

Scale

(i) See basis (ii) Heavy oxidation on the surface of, for example, hot rolled steel coil. Can be recycled for the metal content after removal by abrading or pickling. Scrap (i) Production (or
Found on http://www.metalbulletin.com/Glossary.html

Scale

(i) See basis (ii) Heavy oxidation on the surface of, for example, hot rolled steel coil. Can be recycled for the metal content after removal by abrading or pickling. Scrap (i) Production (or ‘prompt’) scrap; metal arising from fabricating processes such as edge trimmings from rolling, billet discards from extrusion or flash from casti...
Found on http://www.metalbulletin.com/Glossary.html

scale

(skāl) a thin, compacted, flaky fragment, such as of bone or enamel. a bit of dry, horny epidermis, usually ready to be sloughed; called also squama and squame. adj., sca´ly., adj. a scheme or device by which some property may be measured (as hardness, weight, linear dimension). ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

scale

[n] - an ordered reference standard 2. [n] - the ratio between the size of something and a representation of it 3. [n] - relative magnitude 4. [n] - a specialized leaf or bract that protects a bud or catkin 5. [n] - a thin flake of dead epidermis shed from the surface of the skin 6. [n] - (music) a series of notes differi...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=scale

Scale

• (n.) A scale insect. (See below.) • (n.) A ladder; a series of steps; a means of ascending. • (n.) One of the small, thin, membranous, bony or horny pieces which form the covering of many fishes and reptiles, and some mammals, belonging to the dermal part of the skeleton, or dermoskeleton. See Cycloid, Ctenoid, and Ganoid. • (...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/scale/

scale

noun a measuring instrument for weighing; shows amount of mass
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=scale

scale

musical scale noun (music) a series of notes differing in pitch according to a specific scheme (usually within an octave)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=scale

scale

(chemistry) In chemistry, calcium carbonate precipitates that form on the inside of a kettle or boiler as a result of boiling hard water (water containing concentrations of soluble calcium and magnesium salts). The salts present in hard water also precipitate out by reacting with soap molecule...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0030575.html

scale

(mathematics) Numerical relationship, expressed as a ratio, between the actual size of an object and the size of an image that represents it on a map, plan, or diagram. If an object has been enlarged, the amount of increase (scale factor) can be found by dividing a side of the enlarged object ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0036891.html

scale

(music) In music, a progression of single notes upwards or downwards in `steps` (scale originally meant `ladder`). For example, the most common scale is that of C major, which can be found by playing all the white notes on the keyboard from any C to the next C above or belo...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0019064.html

scale

(piel) escama
Found on http://www.aleida.net/gloss3-en.html

Scale

[anatomy] In most biological nomenclature, a scale (Greek λεπίς lepis, Latin squama) is a small rigid plate that grows out of an animal`s skin to provide protection. In lepidopteran (butterfly and moth) species, scales are plates on the surface of the insect wing, and provide coloration. Scales are quite common and have evolved multipl...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale_(anatomy)

Scale

[descriptive set theory] In the mathematical discipline of descriptive set theory, a scale is a certain kind of object defined on a set of points in some Polish space (for example, a scale might be defined on a set of real numbers). Scales were originally isolated as a concept in the theory of uniformization, but have found wide applicabili...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale_(descriptive_set_theory)

Scale

[Lepidopteran anatomy] The presence of scales on the wings of Lepidoptera, comprising moths and butterflies, characterises this order of insects. The name is derived from Ancient Greek λεπίδος (scale) and πτερόν (wing). The wings of Lepidoptera are minutely scaled, which feature gives the name to this order. Scales also cover t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale_(Lepidopteran_anatomy)

Scale

[map] The scale of a map is the ratio of a distance on the map to the corresponding distance on the ground. This simple concept is complicated by the curvature of the Earth`s surface, which forces scale to vary across a map. Because of this variation, the concept of scale becomes meaningful in two distinct ways. The first way is the ratio o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale_(map)

Scale

[music] In music, a scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch. A scale ordered by increasing pitch is an ascending scale, while descending scales are ordered by decreasing pitch. Some scales contain different pitches when ascending than when descending (for instance, see Melodic minor scale). Often, especia...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale_(music)

scale

[music] proceeding by quarter tones`. The enharmonic scale uses dieses (divisions) nonexistent on most keyboards, since modern standard keyboards have only half-tone dieses. More broadly, an enharmonic scale is a scale in which (using standard notation) there is no exact equivalence between a sharpened note and the flattened note it is enha...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/scale_(music)|[musical]_scale
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