Satire

a literary work which belittles or savagely attacks its subject. A distinction is sometimes made between direct and indirect satire.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10135

satire

a play in which abuses, follies, stupidities, vices are ridiculed. Example: 'If Men Played Cards as Women Do,' a satire by George S. Kaufman, 4m.
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Satire

A mode of writing which exposes the failings of individuals, societies or institutions to ridicule and scorn. Its tone varies from tolerant amusement to bitter indignation (as in Sassoon's war poetry).
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satire

Genre of literary or dramatic work that ridicules human pretensions or exposes social evils. Satire is related to parody in its intention to mock, but satire tends to be more subtle and to mock an...
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Satire

Sat'ire noun [ Latin satira , satura , from satura (sc. lanx ) a dish filled with various kinds of fruits, food composed of various ingredients, a mixture, a medley, from satur full of food, sated, from sat , satis , enough: confer French satire
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/19

satire

1. A composition, generally poetical, holding up vice or folly to reprobation; a keen or severe exposure of what in public or private morals deserves rebuke; an invective poem; as, the Satires of Juvenal. ... 2. Keeness and severity of remark; caustic exposure to reprobation; trenchant wit; sarcasm. ... Synonym: Lampoon, sarcasm, irony, ridicule, p...
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Satire

• (a.) Keeness and severity of remark; caustic exposure to reprobation; trenchant wit; sarcasm. • (a.) A composition, generally poetical, holding up vice or folly to reprobation; a keen or severe exposure of what in public or private morals deserves rebuke; an invective poem; as, the Satires of Juvenal.
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Satire

(from the article `Ariosto, Ludovico`) During this period, from 1517 to 1525, he composed his seven satires (titled Satire), modeled after the Sermones (satires) of Horace. The first ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/34

satire

artistic form, chiefly literary and dramatic, in which human or individual vices, follies, abuses, or shortcomings are held up to censure by means of ... [19 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/34

satire

satire 1. The use of wit, especially irony, sarcasm, and ridicule, to criticize faults. 2. A literary work that uses satire (witty language used to convey insults or scorn); or the branch of literature made up of such works in which human vice or folly is attacked through irony, derision, or wit. The term satire is etymologically a 'verse medley'...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/4243/

satire

Literature which mocks human weaknesses, social circumstances, and so on by using irony and sarcasm. Its basic means is exaggeration. It always takes on humorous form, but is usually intended to criticise and hurt people. It means 'diminishing' a subject by making it ridiculous and evoking toward it attitudes of amusement or contempt.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

Satire

A type of comedy that belittles its subject by evoking attitudes of amusement, scorn, or indignation. Satire uses laughter not as an end in itself but as a weapon: satire is justified as a corrective or means of reform. Satire is therefore didactic rather than mimetic. Problems in creating satire: (1) balancing anger and humor, or balancing comedy ...
Found on http://faculty.cua.edu/johnsong/comedy/pages/terms.html

satire

satire, term applied to any work of literature or art whose objective is ridicule. It is more easily recognized than defined. From ancient times satirists have shared a common aim: to expose foolishness in all its guises—vanity, hypocrisy, pedantry, idolatry, bigotry, sentimentality—and ...
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Satire

Art holding vice or folly up to ridicule, or lampooning individuals through the use of irony or sarcasm. -- L.V.
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Satire

Mocking commentaries on social, political and/or economic policies. Satires are usually directed at the body politic (i.e., institutions) but can include scathing reflections on personalities as well
Found on http://www.allmovie.com/glossary/term/satire

satire

Genre of literary or dramatic work that ridicules human pretensions or exposes social evils. Satire is related to parody in its intention to mock, but satire tends to be more subtle and to mock an attitude or a belief, whereas parody tends to mock a particular work (such as a poem) by imitating its s...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0019322.html

Satire

File:Punch.jpg|thumb|1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a great deal of satire of the contemporary, social, and political scene. {Literature}{Performing arts} Satire is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satire

Satire

The literary art of ridiculing a folly or vice in order to expose or correct it.
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Satire

An attack on or criticism of any stupidity or vice in the form of scathing humor, or a critique of w
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385
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