restoration

  1. the reign of Charles II in England; 1660-1685
  2. the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
  3. getting something back again
  4. the state of being restored to its former good condition
  5. the re-establishment of the British monarchy in 1660

Restoration

(from the article `1995: Other Winners`) ...McQuarrie for The Usual SuspectsAdapted Screenplay: Emma Thompson for Sense and SensibilityCinematography: John Toll for BraveheartArt Direction: ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/38

Restoration

(from the article `France`) The restoration and constitutional monarchyIndustrialization, in progress in the Napoleonic period, advanced rapidly under the Restoration (1814–30) and the July Monarchy (1830–48). Gas ... ...tired spirit. He reached the peak of success at a time when his energies had already begun to flag. Gentz w...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/38

Restoration

(from the article `Tremain, Rose`) Tremain`s subsequent books move away from the intense focus on one or two characters and toward less-restricted settings. Her novel Restoration ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/38

Restoration

(from the article `United Kingdom`) Charles II arrived in London on the 30th birthday of what had already been a remarkably eventful life. He came of age in Europe, a child of ... The restoration in 1660 of Charles II (1660–85) was welcomed by many moderates in both Scotland and England. Charles had learned much from his ... Whe...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/38

restoration

(res″tә-ra´shәn) partial or complete reconstruction of a body part. the device used for such a reconstruction.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

restoration

[n] - the reign of Charles II in England 2. [n] - some artifact that has been restored or reconstructed 3. [n] - a model that represents the landscape of a former geological age or that represents and extinct animal etc. 4. [n] - the re-establishment of the British monarchy in 1660 5. [n] - the act of restoring something or s...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=restoration

Restoration

• (n.) That which is restored or renewed. • (n.) The state of being restored; recovery of health, strength, etc.; as, restoration from sickness. • (n.) The act of restoring or bringing back to a former place, station, or condition; the fact of being restored; renewal; reestablishment; as, the restoration of friendship between enemies...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/restoration/

restoration

noun the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=restoration

Restoration

[1660] The Restoration was both a series of events in April–May 1660 and the period that followed it in British history. In 1660 the monarchy was restored the kingdoms of England, Ireland and Scotland in the person of Charles II. The period that followed the Wars of the Three Kingdoms was officially declared an Interregnum. ==England== On...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(1660)

Restoration

[Colonies] The Restoration of the monarchy began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under Charles II after the republic that followed the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. The term Restoration may apply both to the actual event by which the monarchy was restored, and to the period immediately following the e...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(Colonies)

Restoration

[England] The Restoration of the English monarchy began when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under Charles II after the Interregnum that followed the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. The term Restoration is used to describe both the actual event by which the monarchy was restored, and the period of several years afte...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(England)

Restoration

[Ireland] The Restoration of the monarchy began in 1660. The Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland (1649-60) resulted from the Wars of the Three Kingdoms but collapsed in 1659. Politicians such as General Monck tried to ensure a peaceful transition of government from the `Commonwealth` republic back to monarchy. From 1 May 1660 the ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(Ireland)

Restoration

[Latter Day Saints] In the Latter Day Saint movement, the restoration refers to the return of the priesthood and the Church of Christ to the earth after a period of apostasy. While in some ways the term may refer solely to the early history of the religion, in other contexts the term is used in a way to include the time that has elapsed fro...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(Latter_Day_Saints)

Restoration

[Scotland] The Restoration period of Scottish history spanned 3 decades of the late 17th century, from 1660 until the Revolution and Convention of Estates of 1689, during the early modern period. It is usually depicted as an era of authoritarian government, profound religious division, and economic depression, with only modest signs of cult...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(Scotland)

Restoration

[Spain] The Restoration (in Spanish, Restauración or Restauración borbónica) was the name given to the period that began on 29 December 1874 after the First Spanish Republic ended with the restoration of the monarchy under Alfonso XII after a coup d`état by Martinez Campos, and ended on 14 April 1931 with the proclamation of the Second ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(Spain)

Restoration

[television] The coat of arms of Yate in England. From http://www.yatetowncouncil.gov.uk/coatofarms.asp. == Non-free media use rationales == ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restoration_(television)

Restoration

Res`to·ra'tion noun [ Middle English restauracion , French restauration , from Latin restauratio . See Restore .] 1. The act of restoring or bringing back to a former place, station, or condition; the fact of being restored; renewal; reëstablishment; as, the re...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/64

Restoration

A court order to restore a company to the register after it has been struck off. If a company has been struck off at the end of a winding up it can only be restored within two years - but if struck off for another reason, such as failure to file returns, it can be restored within twenty years. The usual reasons are to regain property the company ow...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20546

RESTORATION

A trick in which an object that is destroyed (cut, burned, torn, etc.) is restored to its original or near-original state.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21682

Restoration

After the English Civil War there was a period when England had no king, and was instead ruled by a Lord Protector working with parliament. However, in 1660 Charles II (the son of Charles I) was made king. This was known as the RESTORATION of the monarchy. The phrase is also used to describe the art and society of the period of Charles II reign (16...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Restoration

Any material or devise used to replace lost tooth structure (filling, crown) or to replace a lost tooth or teeth (bridge, dentures, complete or partial).
Found on http://www.cigna.com/glossary/glossary.html?redir=/health/consumer/dental/d

Restoration

Any material or devise used to replace lost tooth structure (filling, crown) or to replace a lost to
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22411

Restoration

Following the ten years of the Commonwealth the monarchy in Britain was restored with the accession in 1660 of Charles II, who immediately appointed Lely as his court painter. Lely had served Charles I in his final years, adapted with great success to the austerity of the Commonwealth period, and then smoothly moved back into royal favour at the re...
Found on http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/definition.jsp?entryId=247

Restoration

In English history, the period when the monarchy, in the person of Charles II, was re-established after the English
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688
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