replace

[v] - put something back where it belongs 2. [v] - substitute a person or thing for (another that is broken or inefficient or lost or no longer working or yielding what is expected)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=replace

Replace

Re┬Ěplace' transitive verb [ Prefix re- + place : confer French replacer .] 1. To place again; to restore to a former place, position, condition, or the like. « The earl . . . was replaced in his government.» Bacon. 2. To refund; to re...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/54

replace

1. To place again; to restore to a former place, position, condition, or the like. 'The earl . . . Was replaced in his government.' (Bacon) ... 2. To refund; to repay; to restore; as, to replace a sum of money borrowed. ... 3. To supply or substitute an equivalent for; as, to replace a lost document. 'With Israel, religion replaced morality.' (M. A...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Replace

• (v. t.) To put in a new or different place. • (v. t.) To place again; to restore to a former place, position, condition, or the like. • (v. t.) To take the place of; to supply the want of; to fulfull the end or office of. • (v. t.) To supply or substitute an equivalent for; as, to replace a lost document. • (v. t.) To ref...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/replace/

Replace

[command] In computing, replace is a command used on DOS, Microsoft Windows and related computer operating systems that is used to replace one or more existing files or add new files to a target directory. The replace command first appeared in DOS 3.2 and has been included in most versions of MS-DOS and IBM PC DOS. It is also included as a ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Replace_(command)

Replace

Recover or return weight to previous supporting foot.
Found on http://www.rounddancing.net/dance/glossary.html
No exact match found