receptor

In general terms, a membrane-bound or membrane-enclosed molecule that binds to, or responds to something more mobile (the ligand), with high specificity. Examples: acetylcholine receptor, photoreceptors.

Receptor

Ecological entity exposed to a stressor.

Receptor

A sensory nerve ending that responds to a stimulus.

receptor

(Humans as organisms) organ which recognizes and responds to stimuli

Receptor

Ecological entity exposed to a stressor.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

receptor

[n] - a cellular structure that is postulated to exist in order to mediate between a chemical agent that acts on nervous tissue and the physiological response
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=receptor

Receptor

A molecule within a cell or on a cell surface to which a substance (such as a hormone or a drug) selectively binds, causing a change in the activity of the cell.
Found on http://www.combichemistry.com/glossary_r.html

receptor

Molecular structure in or on a cell which specifically recognizes and binds to a compound and acts as a physiological signal transducer or mediator of an effect. [2]
Found on http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/enviro/iupacglossary/glossaryr.html

receptor

receptor site. A molecule or surface in a cell that recognizes and binds to a specific messenger molecule, leading to a biological response.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/r.shtml

Receptor

Protein molecules on the surface of cell membranes used for communication between cells.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1445-Receptor

Receptor

A protein located on a cell membrane or within the cell with which a hormone, neurotransmitter or drug interacts to produce or prevent a biological response.
Found on http://www.vernalis.com/component/content/article/101-placing-and-open-offe

Receptor

a nerve cell that responds to a stimulus and produces a nerve impulse; also refers to the area on the surface of a cell that a chemical must bind to in order to have its effect
Found on http://www.medichecks.com/glossary.cfm?ltr=R

Receptor

A receptor is a molecule or a polymeric structure in or on a cell that specifically recognizes and binds a compound acting as a molecular messenger (neurotransmitter, hormone, lymphokine, lectin, drug, etc.).
Found on http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/medchem/ix.html

Receptor

Receptor: 1. In cell biology, a structure on the surface of a cell (or inside a cell) that selectively receives and binds a specific substance. There are many receptors. There is a receptor for (insulin; there is a receptor for low-density lipoproteins (LDL); etc. To take an example, the receptor for substance P, a molecule that acts as a messenger...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5236

receptor

1. A molecular structure within a cell or on the surface characterised by selective binding of a specific substance and a specific physiologic effect that accompanies the binding, for example, cell surface receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, antigens, complement fragments and immunoglobulins and cytoplasmic receptors for steroid horm...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

receptor

(re-sep´tәr) a molecule on or within a cell that recognizes and binds with specific molecules, producing some effect in the cell. One on the cell surface is called a cell-surface or membrane receptor, and one inside a cell (usually in its nucleus) is called a nuclear receptor. Examples are the cell-surface recepto...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

receptor

(from the article `drug`) Receptors are protein molecules that recognize and respond to the body`s own (endogenous) chemical messengers, such as hormones or neurotransmitters. ... ...is assessed. Several imaging methods may be used to determine the degree of metastasis, including X rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, or ... [7 rela...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/19

receptor

(from the article `information processing`) ...with the contents of the short-term memory. The memory stores symbolic expressions, including those that represent composite information ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/19

receptor

in biology, a specialized cell or group of cells that translates a certain type of stimulus, received from the environment or from within the ... [18 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/19

receptor

1. a molecular structure within a cell or on the surface characterized by (1) selective binding of a specific substance and (2) a specific physiologic effect that accompanies the binding, e.g., cell-surface receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, antigens, complement fragments, and immunoglobulins and cytoplasmic receptors for steroid ho...
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio75.html

Receptor

The channel placed at the head and sill in certain types of glaring systems that hold the vertical mullions. Sometimes called 'cans.'
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21054

receptor

A tissue or cell which is sensitive to a specific stimulus
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21114

Receptor

The organ of sense considered as part of the total response mechanism of a human or animal organism. Receptors are classified as a) exteroceptars or receptors at the surface of the body, and b) propioceptors or receptors embedded in the muscles and bodily tissues themselves. The term interoceptors is sometimes applied to receptors embedded in the ....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/r.html

receptor

Type: Term Pronunciation: rē-sep′tŏr, tōr Definitions: 1. A structural protein molecule on the cell surface or within the cytoplasm that binds to a specific factor, such as a drug, hormone, antigen, or neurotransmitter. 2. Any one of the various sensory nerve endings in the skin, deep tissues, viscera, and special sense organs....
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=76357

receptor

In biology, receptors are discrete areas of cell membranes or areas within cells with which neurotransmitters, hormones, and drugs interact. Such interactions control the activities of the body. For example, adrenaline transmits nervous impulses to receptors in the sympathetic nervous system, which initiates the characteristic response to excitemen...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0056313.html
No exact match found