rafter

[n] - one of several parallel sloping beams that support a roof 2. [v] - provide with rafters, as of ceilings
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=rafter

Rafter

Series of structural timbers beneath the roof covering rising from eaves to ridge to which the tiling battens or sarking for sloping roofs are fixed.
Found on http://www.interbuilders.co.uk/glossary/r/rafter.html

Rafter

Timbers that form the main part of the roof frame going from the wall plate up to the ridge.
Found on http://www.selfbuildabc.co.uk/self-build-glossary.html

Rafter

Timbers that form the main part of the roof frame going from the wall plate up to the ridge.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20704

Rafter

Structural member forming the slop of a pitched roof. (Portal frame rafter, truss rafter.)
Found on http://www.corusconstruction.com/en/design_guidance/the_blue_book/

Rafter

A sloping roof member that supports the roof covering which extends from the ridge or the hip of the roof to the eaves. A common rafter is one which runs square with the plate and extends to the ridge. A hip rafter extends from the outside angle of the plate towards the apex of the roof. They are 2' deeper or wider than common rafters. A valley ra...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Rafter

a timber sloping from the ridge to the wall head and supporting the roof coverings. An angle rafter supports hip ends. (illustration).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Rafter

One of the supports of a roof, running from the ridge to a wallhead in a gabled roof, and from the ridges to the wallhead in a hipped roof. The principal rafters are the sloping members at the outer edges of the roof trusses. They support horizontal members known as purlins, which in turn provide support for the common rafters. The sarking or batte...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20938

Rafter

Raft'er (rȧft'ẽr) noun A raftsman.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/5

Rafter

Raft'er noun [ Anglo-Saxon ræfter ; akin to English raft , noun See Raft .] (Architecture) Originally, any rough and somewhat heavy piece of timber. Now, commonly, one of the timbers of a roof which are put on sloping, according to the inclination of the roof. See Illust...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/5

Rafter

Raft'er transitive verb 1. To make into rafters, as timber. 2. To furnish with rafters, as a house. 3. (Agriculture) To plow so as to turn the grass side of each furrow upon an unplowed ridge; to ridge. [ Eng.]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/5

rafter

1. To make into rafters, as timber. ... 2. To furnish with rafters, as a house. ... 3. <agriculture> To plow so as to turn the grass side of each furrow upon an unplowed ridge; to ridge. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

rafter

balk noun one of several parallel sloping beams that support a roof
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=rafter

Rafter

• (v. t.) To furnish with rafters, as a house. • (v. t.) To plow so as to turn the grass side of each furrow upon an unplowed ridge; to ridge. • (n.) A raftsman. • (n.) Originally, any rough and somewhat heavy piece of timber. Now, commonly, one of the timbers of a roof which are put on sloping, according to the inclination of t...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/rafter/

rafter

(from the article `building construction`) ...limited the use of sizable timbers to frames. These frames were usually rectangular in plan, with a central row of columns to support a ridgepole ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/5

Rafter

In architecture the term rafter originally applied to any rough and somewhat heavy piece of timber. Now, it is commonly applied to one of the timbers of a roof which are put on sloping, according to the inclination of the roof.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/TR.HTM

Rafter

- Lumber used to support the roof sheeting and roof loads. Generally, 2 X 10's and 2 X 12's are used. The rafters of a flat roof are sometimes called roof joists.
Found on http://www.homebuildingmanual.com/Glossary.htm

Rafter

  The supporting framing member immediately beneath the deck, sloping from the ridge to the wall plate.
Found on http://www.pmel.org/Roofing-Glossary.htm

RAFTER

A sloping roof member that supports the roof covering which extends from the ridge or the hip of the roof to the eaves. A common rafter is one which runs square with the plate and extends to the ridge. A hip rafter extends from the outside angle of the plate towards the apex of the roof. They are 2' deeper or wider than common rafters. A valley raf...
Found on http://www.proofrock.com/glossary.html

Rafter

The framing member which directly supports the roof sheathing. A rafter usually follows the angle of the roof, and may be a part of a roof truss (see diagram).
Found on http://www.soundhome.com/glossary

Rafter

The main beam supporting a roof system or a sloping roof framing member.
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO

rafter

One of a series of roof support timbers that provide principal support for the roofing material. Rafters usually span parallel to the slope of the roof
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113

Rafter

A construction element used for ceiling support.
Found on http://www.electromn.com/glossary/r.htm

Rafter

Rafter is the collective noun for a group of turkeys.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/BR.HTM

Rafter

A rafter is one of a series of sloped structural members (beams) that extend from the ridge or hip to the wall plate, downslope perimeter or eave, and that are designed to support the roof deck and its associated loads. A pair of rafters is a couple. ==Design== A type of beam that supports the roof of a building. In home construction rafters are t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rafter
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