Radiation

The emission and propagation of energy by means of electromagnetic waves or particles. (cf ionising radiation)

radiation

Energy radiated in the form of waves or particles; photons.
Found on http://www.solarviews.com/eng/terms.htm

radiation

Event of rapid cladogenesis, believed to occur under conditions where a new feature permits a lineage to move into a new niche or new habitat, and is then called an adaptive radiation.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_1.html

radiation

Energy radiated in the form of waves or particles; photons.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20040

Radiation

Transmission of energy though space or any medium. Also known as radiant energy.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Radiation

Process by which energy travels across space.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/weatherwise/glossary/r.shtml

Radiation

Radiation is a general term for energy which radiates out from a source and which can be particulate or part of the Electromagnetic spectrum . It is more useful to specify the quality of the radiation, for example Ionising Radiation or Non-Ionising Radiation .
Found on http://www.ionactive.co.uk/glossary.html

radiation

[n] - the spontaneous emission of a stream of particles or electromagnetic rays in nuclear decay 2. [n] - energy that is radiated or transmitted in the form of rays or waves or particles 3. [n] - the spread of a group of organisms into new habitats 4. [n] - a radial arrangement of nerve fibers connecting different parts of the br...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=radiation

Radiation

The angle and pattern of coverage of a speaker.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Radiation

Electromagnetic waves or particles which travel through space carrying energy.
Found on http://www.solarspace.co.uk/Glossary4.php

Radiation

The emission of radiant energy in the form of particles or waves. See Ionising Radiation and Non-ionising Radiation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

Radiation

The word 'radiation' can refer to electromagnetic radiation (including gamma radiation) or to alpha and beta particles released from radioactive decay. Radiation can cause ionisation of neutral atoms, by knocking away electrons. This can damage or kill cells. In this way, radiation can cause cancer and be used to treat cancer
Found on http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/computing/MainPage/SecDepts/Physics/Resources

Radiation

There are two types of radiation - ionising and nonionising. Nonionising radiation from the sun is essential although excess is dangerous. Exposure to all levels of ionising radiation causes complex disturbances in living tissues
Found on http://www.epaw.co.uk/EPT/glossary.html

Radiation

Radiation simply means the process of emitting energy in the form of waves or particles. For clarity it should be identified by its frequency to be either ionising or non-ionising. A hot water radiator emits electromagnetic radiation in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum and we detect this as heat, sometimes called black heat for i...
Found on http://www.em-surveys.co.uk/Definitions%201.html

Radiation

The emission and propagation of energy by means of electromagnetic waves or particles. (cf ionising radiation)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20725

Radiation

The emitted particles (alpha, beta, neutrons) or photons (gama) from the nuclei of unstable (radioactive) atoms as a result of radioactive decay.
Found on http://www.contractorsunlimited.co.uk/toolbox/nuclear.shtml

Radiation

High energy particles or rays emitted during the nuclear decay processes.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20728

Radiation

Energy emitted from some object.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1439-Radiation

radiation

Energy in the form of photons.
Found on http://www.shodor.org/UNChem/glossary.html

Radiation

(1) Transfer of heat through electromagnetic waves from hot to cold. (2) Electromagnetic waves of energy having frequency and wavelength. The shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) are more energetic. The electromagnetic spectrum is comprised of a) cosmic rays, b) gamma rays, c) x-rays, d) ultraviolet rays, e) visible light rays, f) infrared, g) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20747

Radiation

(Radioactivity) Strictly speaking, radiation means giving off any energy particles or waves and includes heat and light. But usually used to mean radioactivity. This means gamma rays, alpha or beta particles from a radioactive source. The radioactivity comes from the breakdown of atoms. The source can be natural or made in a nuclear reactor. Uncont...
Found on http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/utilities/glossary/index.htm?search=r

Radiation

(1) A propagating disturbance in the electromagnetic field; see light. (2) The evolutionary diversification of a group of organisms from a smaller number of closely related ancestral organisms.
Found on http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/pe/2000_1/retinal/gloss.htm

radiation

1. Transfer of heat between bodies without a change in the temperature of the intervening medium. 2. Any release of energy from its source
Found on http://www.fisicx.com/quickreference/science/glossary.html

Radiation

The emission and propagation of energy by means of electromagnetic waves or sub-atomic particles.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20841

radiation

The mechanism for transfer of heat from a solid surface (such as a component) by electromagnetic transmission.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870
No exact match found