pull

  1. special advantage or influence
  2. a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments
  3. a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke)
  4. a sustained effort

pull

[n] - the force used in pulling 2. [n] - special advantage or influence 3. [n] - a device used for pulling something 4. [n] - a sustained effort 5. [n] - the act of pulling 6. [v] - cause to move in a certain direction by exerting a force upon, either physically or in an abstract sense 7. [v] - move into a certain dir...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=pull

Pull

Pull transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Pulled ; present participle & verbal noun Pulling .] [ Anglo-Saxon pullian ; confer LG. pulen , and Gael. peall , piol , spiol .] 1. To draw...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/192

Pull

Pull intransitive verb To exert one's self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. To pull apart , to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart . -- To pull up , to draw the reins; to stop; to halt. --
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/192

Pull

Pull noun 1. The act of pulling or drawing with force; an effort to move something by drawing toward one. « I awakened with a violent pull upon the ring which was fastened at the top of my box.» Swift. 2. A contest; a struggle; as, a wrestling pull ....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/192

pull

1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. 'Ne'er pull your hat upon your brows.' (Shak) 'He put forth his hand . . . And pulled her in.' (Gen. Viii. 9) ... 2. To draw apart; to tear; to rend. 'He hath turned aside my ways, and pulled me in pieces; he hath made me desolate.' (Lam. Iii. 11) ... 3. To gather with the hand, or by dr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

pull

pulling noun the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you; `the pull up the hill had him breathing harder`; `his strenuous pulling strained his back`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=pull

pull

deplumate verb strip of feathers; `pull a chicken`; `pluck the capon`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=pull

Pull

• (v. t.) To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward one; to pluck; as, to pull fruit; to pull flax; to pull a finch. • (v. t.) To draw apart; to tear; to rend. • (v. t.) To move or operate by the motion of drawing towards one; as, to pull a bell; to pull an oar. • (v. t.) To hold back, and so prevent from winning; as, the fa...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/pull/

pull

(from the article `cricket`) ...the ball is deflected behind the wicket on the leg side; cut, in which the batsman hits a ball on the uprise (after it has hit the ground on the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/132

Pull

Used in the context of general equities. See: Cancel.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosp.htm

Pull

Referring to general equities, to cancel. Discover What It`s Like to Live Easy With EquiTrend
Found on http://www.equitrend.com/glossary3130.xhtml

Pull

[philately] In philately, a pull is created when an impression of a handstamp or die is made. The wording or design of a handstamp or die appears in reverse when viewing the original so it is necessary to make a pull on to paper to view the image as it will appear in use. Pulls are made of die proofs in order to check progress when engravin...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pull_(philately)

Pull

A noun referring to the installation of one or more cables.
Found on http://www.youngco.com/young2.asp?ID=4&Type=3

Pull

Decorative and functional object attached to a drawer or door to allow easy grip for opening and closing.
Found on http://www.artisansofthevalley.com/comm_gloss3.html

Pull

Usually refers to the proportion of response by mail or phone to a given promotional activity.
Found on http://www.nmoa.org/Library/index.htm

Pull

Pull is British slang for to achieve a communing with a desirable person.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZP.HTM

pull

A ball that goes to the left of the target with little curve as hit by a right-handed player. The converse applies to left-handed players.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21422

Pull

a poor shot played severely to the left; as opposed to hooks, which curve from right to left, a pulled shot goes directly left.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_golf

Pull

A golf ball's trajectory in which the ball initially moves towards left of the line of the target and goes on in the same direction, ending up on the left side of the target. This is for a right handed golfer.
Found on http://www.buzzle.com/articles/golf-terminology-glossary-of-golf-terms.html

Pull

When the ball flies in an inward direction after being stuck. Not the same as draw/hook as these are shots affected by spin.
Found on http://www.golfeurope.com/almanac/golf_terms/lex_p.htm

Pull

Me and the lads used to go to the disco when we were on the pull. It means looking for birds. Of course, it works the other way round too. The ladies may also be on the pull, though probably a bit more subtly than the chaps!
Found on http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml

Pull

- a back-foot leg-side shot, distinct from the hook because the pull is played to a ball that hasn't risen as high.
Found on http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/story/239756.html

Pull

a shot played to the leg side to a short-pitched delivery, between mid-wicket and backward square-leg.
Found on http://cricker.com/glossary/

Pull

A cross-bat, usually back-foot batting shot, directed into the sector between long-leg and mid-on.
Found on http://www.wandererscricket.com/glossary.html
No exact match found