prostacyclin

(= PGI2) Unstable prostaglandin released by mast cells and endothelium, a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation; also causes vasodilation and increased vascular permeability. Release enhanced by bradykinin.

prostacyclin

<biochemistry> Unstable prostaglandin released by mast cells and endothelium, a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation, also causes vasodilation and increased vascular permeability. Release enhanced by bradykinin. ... (13 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

prostacyclin

(pros″tә-si´klin) a prostaglandin, PGI2, synthesized by endothelial cells lining the walls of arteries and veins; it is a potent vasodilator and a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. When used pharmaceutically it is called epoprostenol.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

prostacyclin

(from the article `drug`) Under normal conditions the adhesion of platelets to vessel walls is prevented by the vascular endothelial cells, at least in part by their ability ... Thromboxanes and prostacyclins play an important role in the formation of blood clots. The process of clot formation begins with an aggregation of ... ...the...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/122

prostacyclin

Type: Term Pronunciation: pros′tă-sī′klin Definitions: 1. A potent natural inhibitor of platelet aggregation and a powerful vasodilator. Synonyms: epoprostenol, epoprostenol sodium
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=72855

Prostacyclin

As a drug, it is also known as `epoprostenol`. The terms are sometimes used interchangeably. ==History== During the 1960s, a U.K. research team, headed by Professor John Vane, began to explore the role of prostaglandins in anaphylaxis and respiratory diseases. Working with a team from the Royal College of Surgeons, Sir John discovered that aspir.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostacyclin
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