presumption

  1. an assumption that is taken for granted
  2. (law) an inference of the truth of a fact from other facts proved or admitted or judicially noticed
  3. audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to
  4. a kind of discourtesy in the form of an act of presuming

presumption

arrogance 
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presumption

[n] - (law) an inference of the truth of a fact from other facts proved or admitted or judicially noticed 2. [n] - audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to 3. [n] - a kind of discourtesy in the form of an act of presuming
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=presumption

Presumption

Pre·sump'tion noun [ Latin praesumptio : confer French présomption , Old French also presumpcion . See Presume .] 1. The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence; the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon incomplete proof. 2. Gro...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/157

presumption

presumptuousness noun audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to; `he despised them for their presumptuousness`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=presumption

presumption

noun a kind of discourtesy in the form of an act of presuming; `his presumption was intolerable`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=presumption

Presumption

• (n.) Ground for presuming; evidence probable, but not conclusive; strong probability; reasonable supposition; as, the presumption is that an event has taken place. • (n.) The act of venturing beyond due beyond due bounds; an overstepping of the bounds of reverence, respect, or courtesy; forward, overconfident, or arrogant opinion or con...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/presumption/

presumption

presumption 1. The taking upon onself of more than is warranted by one's position, right, or (formerly) ability; forward or over-confident opinion or conduct; arrogance, pride, effrontery, assurance. 2. The assuming or taking of something for granted; also, that which is presumed or assumed to be, or to be true, on probable evidence; a belief deduc...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1744/15

Presumption

A fact assumed to be true under the law is called a presumption. For example, a criminal defendant is presumed to be innocent until the prosecuting attorney proves beyond a reasonable doubt that she is guilty. Presumptions are used to relieve a party from having to actually prove the truth of the fact being presumed. Once a presumption is relied on...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/p149.htm

Presumption

It is a rule of law which states that a court is allowed to assume certain facts and proofs established earlier, to be true, unless someone else comes up to contest such facts and prove it otherwise.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

presumption

n. a rule of law which permits a court to assume a fact is true until such time as there is a preponderance (greater weight) of evidence which disproves or outweighs (rebuts) the presumption. Each presumption is based upon a particular set of apparent facts paired with established laws, logic, reasoning or individual rights. A presumption is rebutt...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=1592

Presumption

In the law of evidence, a presumption of a particular fact can be made without the aid of proof in some situations. The types of presumption includes a rebuttable discretionary presumption, a rebuttable mandatory presumption, and an irrebuttable or conclusive presumption. The invocation of a presumption shifts the burden of proof from one party to...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presumption

Presumption

A rule of law that permits a court to assume a fact is true until such time as there is a preponderance of evidence which disproves or outweighs the presumption. A presumption shifts the burden to the opposing party to prove that the assumption is untrue.
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/presumption-term.html
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