perspective

  1. a way of regarding situations or topics etc.
  2. the appearance of things relative to one another as determined by their distance from the viewer

perspective

the process of viewing something from a distinct vantage point; or, the impression one has of an object or landscape from particular vantage point

perspective

[n] - the appearance of things relative to one another as determined by their distance from the viewer
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=perspective

Perspective

The way artists create an illusion of a three dimensional image onto a two dimensional painting or drawing. Art techniques used to achieve perspective are: ensuring variation between dimensions of scenes, placing images that are on the ground as lower when nearer and higher when deeper. There are three major types of perspective: aerial, herringbon...
Found on http://www.redraggallery.co.uk/art-glossary.html

perspective

Realistic representation of a three-dimensional object in two dimensions. One-point linear perspective is an effective way to give a picture depth and a sense of distance and space. It is based...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Perspective

A system for representing objects in three-dimensional space (ie for representing the visible world) on the two-dimensional surface of a picture. Basic, or linear perspective, was invented in Italy in the early fifteenth century and first developed by the painter Paolo Uccello. Perspective rests on the fact that although parallel lines never meet, ...
Found on http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/definition.jsp?entryId=220

Perspective

The angle or level from which the photographer takes the photograph; the camera and photographer's 'point of view'. The rendition of apparent space in a flat photograph, i.e., how far the foreground and background appear to be separated from each other; determined by only one factor: the camera-to-subject distance; if objects appear in their normal...
Found on http://www.rodsmith.org.uk/photographic%20glossary/rods%20photographic%20gl

Perspective

Per·spec'tive adjective [ Latin perspicere , perspectum , to look through; per + spicere , specere , to look: confer French perspectif ; or from English perspective , noun See Spy , noun ] 1. Of or pertaining to the s...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/62

Perspective

Per·spec'tive noun [ French perspective , from perspectif : confer Italian perspettiva . See Perspective , adjective ] 1. A glass through which objects are viewed. [ Obsolete] 'Not a perspective , but a mirror.' Sir T. Browne.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/62

perspective

1. A glass through which objects are viewed. 'Not a perspective, but a mirror.' ... 2. That which is seen through an opening; a view; a vista. 'The perspective of life.' ... 3. The effect of distance upon the appearance of objects, by means of which the eye recognised them as being at a more or less measurable distance. Hence, aerial perspective, t...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

perspective

linear perspective noun the appearance of things relative to one another as determined by their distance from the viewer
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=perspective

Perspective

• (a.) The art and the science of so delineating objects that they shall seem to grow smaller as they recede from the eye; -- called also linear perspective. • (n.) Of or pertaining to the science of vision; optical. • (a.) A drawing in linear perspective. • (a.) A glass through which objects are viewed. • (a.) That which i...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/perspective/

perspective

(from the article `eye, human`) ...movements of objects in relation to each other when the head is moved. Objects nearer the observer move in relation to more distant points in the ... ...seen touching converging lines, as in the Ponzo illusion, seems larger than another figure of the same size placed between the lines where they ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/48

perspective

method of graphically depicting three-dimensional objects and spatial relationships on a two-dimensional plane or on a plane that is shallower than ... [10 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/48

Perspective

[geometry] Two figures in a plane are perspective from a point O if the lines joining corresponding points of the figures all meet at O. Dually, the figures are said to be perspective from a line if the points of intersection of corresponding lines all lie on one line. The proper setting for this concept is in projective geometry where ther...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_(geometry)

Perspective

The angle or level from which the photographer takes the photograph; the camera and photographer's 'point of view'
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21048

perspective

See point of view
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

Perspective

Representing three-dimensional volumes and space in two dimensions in a manner that imitates depth, height and width as seen with stereoscopic eyes
Found on http://www.watercolorpainting.com/glossary.htm

Perspective

Technique of representing three-dimensional space on a flat or relief surface giving a sense of depth. Linear perspective foreshortens objects as they recede into the distance with lines converging to a vanishing point. Aerial perspective is based on contrasts of colour and shade, which are stronger in the foreground and fainter in the distance.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21096

Perspective

The representation of three-dimensional objects on a flat surface so as to produce the same impression of distance and relative size as that received by the human eye. In one-point linear prespective, developed during the fifteenth century, all parallel lines in a given visual field converge at a single vanishing point on the horizon. In aerial or ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21109

perspective

a way of thinking about or considering something; or a set of assumptions from which an object can be viewed. Knowing which perspec¬tive is assumed is important because the same question can have different an¬swers if different perspectives are assumed. Kant himself does not use this word, but he uses a number of other expressions (such as standp...
Found on http://www.hkbu.edu.hk/~ppp/ksp1/KSPglos.html

perspective

perspective, in art, any method employed to represent three-dimensional space on a flat surface or in relief sculpture. Although many periods in art showed some progressive diminution of objects seen in depth, linear perspective, in the modern sense, was probably first formulated in 15th-century Flo...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0838527.html

Perspective

(Lat. perspectus pp. of pelspicio, to look through) The determination of inclusiveness of what can be actual for any organization. The point of view of an individual on the rest of existence. (a) In epistemology: the perspective predicament, the limited though real viewpoint of the individual, the plight of being confined to the experience of only....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/p.html

Perspective

Spatial relationships. In film (painting, photography, theatrical performances, et cetera) perspective refers to the accurate depiction of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. (In experimental forms of film, of course, the accurate depiction is redefined.) Height and breadth come naturally to the surface but the added dimension of ...
Found on http://www.allmovie.com/glossary/term/perspective

perspective

Realistic representation of a three-dimensional object in two dimensions. One-point linear perspective is an effective way to give a picture depth and a sense of distance and space. It is based on three key principles: that the horizon line is always at eye-level; that the vanishing point is the point to which all lines parallel...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0036028.html
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