perspective

  1. a way of regarding situations or topics etc.
  2. the appearance of things relative to one another as determined by their distance from the viewer

perspective

(from the article `eye, human`) ...movements of objects in relation to each other when the head is moved. Objects nearer the observer move in relation to more distant points in the ... ...seen touching converging lines, as in the Ponzo illusion, seems larger than another figure of the same size placed between the lines where they ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/48

Perspective

(Lat. perspectus pp. of pelspicio, to look through) The determination of inclusiveness of what can be actual for any organization. The point of view of an individual on the rest of existence. (a) In epistemology: the perspective predicament, the limited though real viewpoint of the individual, the plight of being confined to the experience of only....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/p.html

perspective

[n] - the appearance of things relative to one another as determined by their distance from the viewer
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=perspective

Perspective

• (a.) The art and the science of so delineating objects that they shall seem to grow smaller as they recede from the eye; -- called also linear perspective. • (n.) Of or pertaining to the science of vision; optical. • (a.) A drawing in linear perspective. • (a.) A glass through which objects are viewed. • (a.) That which i...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/perspective/

perspective

linear perspective noun the appearance of things relative to one another as determined by their distance from the viewer
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=perspective

Perspective

[cognitive] Perspective in theory of cognition is the choice of a context or a reference (or the result of this choice) from which to sense, categorize, measure or codify experience, cohesively forming a coherent belief, typically for comparing with another. One may further recognize a number of subtly distinctive meanings, close to those o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_(cognitive)

Perspective

[geometry] Two figures in a plane are perspective from a point O if the lines joining corresponding points of the figures all meet at O. Dually, the figures are said to be perspective from a line if the points of intersection of corresponding lines all lie on one line. The proper setting for this concept is in projective geometry where ther...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_(geometry)

Perspective

[graphical] Perspective (from perspicere to see through) in the graphic arts, such as drawing, is an approximate representation, on a flat surface (such as paper), of an image as it is seen by the eye. The two most characteristic features of perspective are that objects are drawn: == Overview == Linear perspective always works by representi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_(graphical)

Perspective

[pharmacoeconomic] Five general perspectives are often cited in pharmacoeconomics, including institutional, third party, patient, governmental and societal. The author must state the perspective and then ensure that costs and valuations remain consistent with it throughout the study,explaining briefly the applicable nomenclature. This shoul...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_(pharmacoeconomic)

Perspective

[video game] Perspective is an experimental puzzle video game that includes aspects of a 2-dimensional platform game. The player moves the avatar through a 2D screen that changes based on the player`s camera angle in 3D space. This perspective-shifting mechanic is used to reach a goal at the end of each level. When the player takes control ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_(video_game)

Perspective

[visual] Perspective, in the context of vision and visual perception, is the way in which objects appear to the eye based on their spatial attributes; or their dimensions and the position of the eye relative to the objects. There are two main meanings of the term: linear perspective and aerial perspective. The development of new forms of ge...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_(visual)

Perspective

Per·spec'tive adjective [ Latin perspicere , perspectum , to look through; per + spicere , specere , to look: confer French perspectif ; or from English perspective , noun See Spy , noun ] 1. Of or pertaining to the s...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/62

perspective

1. A glass through which objects are viewed. 'Not a perspective, but a mirror.' ... 2. That which is seen through an opening; a view; a vista. 'The perspective of life.' ... 3. The effect of distance upon the appearance of objects, by means of which the eye recognised them as being at a more or less measurable distance. Hence, aerial perspective, t...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

perspective

a point of view. People have varying perspectives about wolves.
Found on http://www.northernlightswildlife.com/glossary.html

Perspective

A system for representing objects in three-dimensional space (ie for representing the visible world) on the two-dimensional surface of a picture. Basic, or linear perspective, was invented in Italy in the early fifteenth century and first developed by the painter Paolo Uccello. Perspective rests on the fact that although parallel lines never meet, ...
Found on http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/definition.jsp?entryId=220

perspective

a way of regarding situations or topics
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/435003

perspective

a way of regarding situations or topics
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/934465

perspective

a way of thinking about or considering something; or a set of assumptions from which an object can be viewed. Knowing which perspec¬tive is assumed is important because the same question can have different an¬swers if different perspectives are assumed. Kant himself does not use this word, but he uses a number of other expressions (such as standp...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21178

perspective

a way of thinking about or considering something; or a set of assumptions from which an object can be viewed. Knowing which perspec­tive is assumed is important because the same question can have different an­swers if different perspectives are assumed. Kant himself does not use this word, but he uses a number of other expressions (such as standp...
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary074.htm

perspective

Kant himself did not use this word, but he used a number of other, equiv­alent expressions, such as standpoint, way of thinking, employment of understanding, etc. The main Critical perspectives are the transcendental, empirical, logical, and hypothetical. See also perspective*.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary078.htm

perspective

method of graphically depicting three-dimensional objects and spatial relationships on a two-dimensional plane or on a plane that is shallower than ... [10 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/48

perspective

Palmquist's term for a way of thinking about or dealing with an issue or problem, or a set of assumptions adopted when viewing an object*. Knowing which perspec­tive is assumed is important because the same question can have different an­swers if different perspectives are assumed. See also perspective*.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary078.htm

perspective

perspective, in art, any method employed to represent three-dimensional space on a flat surface or in relief sculpture. Although many periods in art showed some progressive diminution of objects seen in depth, linear perspective, in the modern sense, was probably first formulated in 15th-century Flo...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0838527.html

perspective

Realistic representation of a three-dimensional object in two dimensions. One-point linear perspective is an effective way to give a picture depth and a sense of distance and space. It is based...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688
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