period

  1. an amount of time
  2. a stage in the history of a culture having a definable place in space and time
  3. the interval taken to complete one cycle of a regularly repeating phenomenon
  4. a time of life characterized as a distinct phase
  5. the monthly discharge of blood from the uterus of nonpregnant women from puberty to menopause
  6. a punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative se......

    period

    Rows in the periodic table are called periods. For example, all of the elements in the second row are referred to as 'second period elements'. All elements currently known fall in the first seven periods.
    Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/p.shtml

    period

    (from the article `alternating current`) ...opposite direction, returns again to the original value, and repeats this cycle indefinitely. The interval of time between the attainment of a ... ...example with 0 = 170 volts and = 377 radians per second, so that = 170 cos(377). The time interval required for the pattern to be repeated is ...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/45

    period

    (from the article `chemical bonding`) ...configurations, suggesting that all members of a group should show a family relationship in the types and numbers of the chemical bonds that they ... Mendeleyev`s periodic table of 1869 contained 17 columns, with two nearly complete periods (sequences) of elements, from potassium to bromine and ....
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/45

    period

    (from the article `punctuation`) The end of a grammatically complete sentence is marked by a full point, full stop, or period. The period may also be used to mark abbreviations. The ...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/45

    period

    (pēr´e-әd) an interval or division of time; the time for the regular recurrence of a phenomenon.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

    Period

    (wave) The time interval between successive crests in a sinusoidal wave train; the period is the inverse of the frequency of a cyclic event.
    Found on http://earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/info-gen/glossa-eng.php

    period

    [n] - a stage in the history of a culture having a definable place in space and time 2. [n] - the interval taken to complete one cycle of a regularly repeating phenomenon 3. [n] - one of three periods of play in hockey games 4. [n] - a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed 5. [n] - the end or completio...
    Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=period

    Period

    • (n.) A complete sentence, from one full stop to another; esp., a well-proportioned, harmonious sentence. • (n.) One of the great divisions of geological time; as, the Tertiary period; the Glacial period. See the Chart of Geology. • (n.) The termination or completion of a revolution, cycle, series of events, single event, or act; he...
    Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/period/

    period

    noun a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed; `ganoid fishes swarmed during the earlier geological periods`
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    period

    point noun a punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative sentence to indicate a full stop or after abbreviations; `in England they call a period a stop`
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    Period

    [gene] Period (per) is a gene located on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Oscillations in levels of both per transcript and its corresponding protein PER have a period of approximately 24 hours and together play a central role in the molecular mechanism of the Drosophila biological clock driving circadian rhythms in eclosion and...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Period_(gene)

    Period

    [geology] A geologic period is one of several subdivisions of geologic time enabling cross-referencing of rocks and geologic events from place to place. These periods form elements of a hierarchy of divisions into which geologists have split the earth`s history. Eons and eras are larger subdivisions than periods while periods themselves may...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Period_(geology)

    Period

    [music] ==Western art music== In Western art music or Classical music, a period is a group of phrases consisting usually of at least one antecedent phrase and one consequent phrase totaling about 8 measures in length (though this varies depending on meter and tempo). Generally, the antecedent ends in a weaker and the consequent in a stronge...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Period_(music)

    Period

    [Periodic table] Image is free for use even if is found in a site because is released by other people which release it to the public domain. ...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Period_(Periodic_table)

    Period

    [periodic table] In the periodic table of the elements, elements are arranged in a series of rows (or periods) so that those with similar properties appear in a column. Elements of the same period have the same number of electron shells; with each group across a period, the elements have one more proton and electron and become less metallic...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Period_(periodic_table)

    Period

    [school] A school period is a block of time allocated for lessons, classes or other activities in schools. They typically last between 40 and 60 minutes, with around 3-8 periods per school day. However, especially in higher education, there can be many more. Educators determine the number and length of these periods, and may even regulate h...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Period_(school)

    Period

    Pe'ri·od intransitive verb To come to a period; to conclude. [ Obsolete] 'You may period upon this, that,' etc. Felthman.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/56

    Period

    Pe'ri·od noun [ Latin periodus , Greek ... a going round, a way round, a circumference, a period of time; ... round, about + ... a way: confer French période .] 1. A portion of time as limited and determined by some recurring phenomenon, as by the completion of a revolution of one...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/56

    Period

    Pe'ri·od transitive verb To put an end to. [ Obsolete] Shak.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/56

    Period

    a designated length of time in history.
    Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

    period

    A division of geologic time lasting tens of millions of years which shorter than an era and longer than an epoch.
    Found on http://www.scientificpsychic.com/etc/geology-glossary.html

    period

    a horizontal row of elements in the periodic table.
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22434

    Period

    A second order geological time unit.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20206

    Period

    a series of elements, arranged in order of atomic number represented by a horizontal row on the Periodic Table.
    Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1238-Period
    No exact match found