pelt

  1. the dressed hairy coat of a mammal
  2. body covering of a living animal

pelt

(from the article `fur`) The pelts of fur-bearing animals are called true furs when they consist of two elements: a dense undercoat, called ground hair, and longer hairs, ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/37

pelt

[v] - cast, hurl, or throw repeatedly with some missile
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=pelt

Pelt

• (v. i.) To throw out words. • (n.) The skin of a beast with the hair on; a raw or undressed hide; a skin preserved with the hairy or woolly covering on it. See 4th Fell. • (v. t.) To throw; to use as a missile. • (n.) The human skin. • (n.) The body of any quarry killed by the hawk. • (v. t.) To strike with something...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/pelt/

Pelt

Pelt intransitive verb 1. To throw missiles. Shak. 2. To throw out words. [ Obsolete] « Another smothered seems to pelt and swear.» Shak.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/44

Pelt

Pelt noun [ Confer German pelz a pelt, fur, from Old French pelice , French pelisse (see Pelisse ); or perhaps shortened from peltry .] 1. The skin of a beast with the hair on; a raw or undressed hide; a skin preserved with the hairy or woolly covering on it....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/44

Pelt

Pelt transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Pelted ; present participle & verbal noun Pelting .] [ Middle English pelten , pulten , pilten , to thrust, throw, strike; confer Latin pultare , equiv. to
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/44

pelt

1. To strike with something thrown or driven; to assail with pellets or missiles, as, to pelt with stones; pelted with hail. 'The children billows seem to pelt the clouds.' (Shak) ... 2. To throw; to use as a missile. 'My Phillis me with pelted apples plies.' (Dryden) ... Origin: OE. Pelten, pulten, pilten, to thrust, throw, strike; cf. L. Pultare,...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Pelt

light shield.
Found on http://s_van_dorst.tripod.com/Ancient_Warfare/Greece/greek_glossary.html

Pelt

skin and fur of a rabbit to be tanned.
Found on https://riseandshinerabbitry.com/2014/01/26/rabbit-terminology/

Pelt

The dead body of any quarry the falcon has killed.
Found on http://falcons.woodmen.org/glossary.cfm

Pelt

The hide of an animal after it has been removed
Found on https://quitebunnyrabbitry.weebly.com/glossary.html#

Pelt

the hide or skin of an animal (Stein 1966).
Found on http://imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/glsry.htm

pelt

the skin and fur of an animal. Note that pelage is the hairy coat of an animal. The pelt is the skin and the hair or fur.
Found on http://www.northernlightswildlife.com/glossary.html

Pelt

The skin and fur of an animal. Note that the pelage is the coat of hair and fur. The pelt is the skin as well as the hair and fur.
Found on http://www.wolf.org/wolves/learn/basic/glossary.asp

PELT

The skin of a goat.
Found on http://www.extension.org/pages/27530/goat-glossary-of-terms#.Uj3dsj9rPgY

PELT

the skin of a sheep including the wool.
Found on http://www.danekeclublambs.com/Glossary.html

Pelt

The skin of a sheep including the wool.
Found on http://www.sheepusa.org/

Pelt

the skin of a sheep with the wool on.
Found on http://www.sheep101.info/201/glossary.html

Pelt

The skin of an animal with the fur still on it.
Found on http://www.digitalstroud.co.uk/glossary.php?glossgroup=W-Z

Pelt

The word pelt is used to describe the skin taken off an animal when the skin still has the hair, fur, or wool on it. Animal pelts were often used to make clothing because the fur was thought to be beautiful, and it kept its wearer extremely warm. Today, many people oppose the use of animal fur to make clothing, and so animals are not often killed f...
Found on https://www.nps.gov/subjects/islandofthebluedolphins/glossary.htm

Pelt

This word means, strictly speaking, any kind of skin (Latin pellis, related to the German felle, a skin, and the English word fell, now preserved only in fellmonger). The word is somewhat loosely used in the leather industry, but its only common applications nowadays are to sheepskins in two or three slightly differing senses: (1) to the skin prope...
Found on http://redwood.uk.com/glossary
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