Paradox

[horse] Paradox (1882–1890) was a British Thoroughbred racehorse and sire. In a career that lasted from October 1884 until October 1885 he ran eight times and won six races. Despite running only twice in 1884, he proved himself to be one of the best two-year-olds of his generation by winning the Dewhurst Plate. In the following year he wo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox_(horse)

Paradox

an assertion seemingly opposed to common sense, but that may yet have some truth in it.
*What a pity that youth must be wasted on the young. George Bernard Shaw
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

Paradox

Seemingly absurd statement which, on closer examination, reveals an important truth e.g. Wordsworth's ' The child is father of the man'.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

paradox

[n] - (logic) a self-contradiction
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=paradox

Paradox

a figure of speech in which an apparent contradiction contains a truth
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Paradox

an apparent contradiction. e.g. Riches make men miserable. (One would normally assume that wealth would bring happiness, rather than misery.)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20629

paradox

Literary device or device of rhetoric which is a statement that seems opposing or contradictory but contains an element of truth. The truth is emphasized by the unexpected form of expression. The...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Paradox

Par`a·dox noun ; plural Paradoxes . [ French paradoxe , Latin paradoxum , from Greek ...; para` beside, beyond, contrary to + ... to think, suppose, imagine. See Para- , and Dogma .] A tenet or proposition contrary to received opinion; an assertio...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/18

paradox

That which is apparently, though not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to the known facts in any case. ... Origin: G. Paradoxos, incredible, beyond belief, fr. Doxa, belief ... Weber's paradox, if a muscle is loaded beyond its power to contract it may elongate. ... (05 Mar 2000) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

paradox

noun (logic) a statement that contradicts itself; ``I always lie` is a paradox because if it is true it must be false`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=paradox

paradox

This word is used in a particular way within the literature of economics -- not to describe a situation in which facts are apparently in conflict, but to describe situations in which apparent facts are in conflict with models or theories to which some class of people holds allegiance. This use of the word implies strong belief in the measured facts...
Found on http://www.econterms.com/glossary.cgi?query=paradox

Paradox

• (n.) A tenet or proposition contrary to received opinion; an assertion or sentiment seemingly contradictory, or opposed to common sense; that which in appearance or terms is absurd, but yet may be true in fact.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/paradox/

paradox

(from the article `complexity`) Paradoxes typically arise from false assumptions, which then lead to inconsistencies between observed and expected behaviour. Sometimes paradoxes ... Mathematical paradoxes and fallacies have long intrigued mathematicians. A mathematical paradox is a mathematical conclusion so unexpected that it is ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/16

paradox

apparently self-contradictory statement, the underlying meaning of which is revealed only by careful scrutiny. The purpose of a paradox is to arrest ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/16

paradox

paradox 1. A statement or tenet contrary to received opinion or belief; often with the implication that it is marvellous or incredible; sometimes with unfavorable connotation, as being discordant with what is held to be established truth, and hence absurd or fantastic; sometimes with favorable connotation, as a correction of vulgar error. 2. A stat...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2460/2

Paradox

As used in economics, it seems to mean something unexpected, rather than the more extreme normal meaning of something seemingly impossible. Some paradoxes are just theoretical results that go against what one thinks of as normal. Others, like the Leontief paradox, are empirical findings that seem to contradict theoretical predictions.
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/p.html

paradox

a self-contradictory phrase or sentence, such as 'the ascending rain' or Alexander Pope's description of man, 'Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all.' Don Marquis's 'quote buns by great men quote' (archys life of mehitabel [London: Faber and Faber, 1934]: 103-04), describes a drunk trying to go up a down-escalator as 'falling upwards / throug...
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

paradox

A seemingly self-contradictory and therefore absurd and senseless statement; sometimes, however, a paradox can contain some universal and important truth which is revealed on second thought.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

paradox

Please accept my resignation. I don't want to belong to any club that will accept me as a member. —Groucho Marx (1895-1977) A statement that seems to lead to a logical self-contradiction, or to a situation that contradicts common intuition. The word 'paradox' comes from the Greek para (...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/P/paradox.html

paradox

paradox, statement that appears self-contradictory but actually has a basis in truth, e.g., Oscar Wilde's “Ignorance is like a delicate fruit; touch it and the bloom is gone.” Many New Critics maintained that paradox is not just a rhetorical or illustrative device but a basic aspect of a...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0837568.html

Paradox

Paradox 3.0 was a relational database manager from Borland International, that, the manufacturers claimed, stuck a balance between functionality and ease of use. It offered the power of many of the advanced database products, yet was easy enough for the novice to use. It included enhanced relational operations, presentation-quality graphics, crosst...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GP.HTM

paradox

Type: Term Pronunciation: par′ă-doks Definitions: 1. That which is apparently, although not actually, inconsistent with or opposed to the known facts in any case.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=65005

paradox

Literary device or device of rhetoric which is a statement that seems opposing or contradictory but contains an element of truth. The truth is emphasized by the unexpected form of expression. The Bible is a rich source of paradox: `Love your enemies`; `The first shall be last and the last shall be first.`
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038739.html

Paradox

[magazine] Paradox: The Magazine of Historical and Speculative Fiction (also known as Paradox Magazine or simply Paradox) was an award-winning literary magazine featuring original short historical fiction in all of its forms up to novella length. This includes mainstream historical fiction as well as other genre fiction with historical them...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox_(magazine)

Paradox

[literature] In literature, the paradox is an anomalous juxtaposition of incongruous ideas for the sake of striking exposition or unexpected insight. It functions as a method of literary composition - and analysis - which involves examining apparently contradictory statements and drawing conclusions either to reconcile them or to explain th...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox_(literature)
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