Organic

1. Referring to or derived from living organisms. 2. In chemistry, any compound containing carbon.

Organic

1. Of or relating to or derived from living organisms. 2. Organic also refers to organic foods, or foods raised according to standards of organic agriculture, including the use of crop rotation to control plant diseases and pests and to allow rejuvenation of soil nutrients; additionally, the use of nonsynthetic fertilizers such as to build soil structure and microbial life as the basis for strong plants. 3. A fertilizer that is derived from vegetable or animal matter. ...

Organic

Literally refers to something derived from plant or animal matter. Includes anything that is or was living, made from something living, excreted from something living. The term 'organic' is used to describe a philosophy of working within the laws and systems existing in nature to achieve a healthy environment that is bountiful long-term. Healthy soil is the foundation of this philosophy, therefore, the term comes up frequently in discussions of home composting. ...

Organic

Indicates an illness where there is structural change i.e. A physical disease rather than a psychological one

Organic

Used to describe substances that are derived from animal or vegetable matter such as manure and compost

Organic

Having to do with living matter. Organic chemistry covers all substances containing carbon, hence it covers hydrocarbons.

Organic

of plant or animal origin.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20003

organic

adj. Pertaining to compounds containing carbon. Also refers to living things or the materials made by living things. inorganic– ant.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss5ecol.html

Organic

When referring to chemical compounds, anything that contains carbon. The original definition was more like 'any chemical found in or derived from a living organism' and most chemists still feel funny calling carbon monoxide or the carbonate ion (CO32-) organic compoinds.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20046

Organic

Fertilizers and chemicals that have been obtained from a source which is or has been alive. Also the general term used for a type of gardening using no chemical or synthetic fertilizers or pesticides.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20077

Organic

1. Referring to or derived from living organisms. 2. In chemistry, any compound containing carbon.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

Organic

Deriving from living organisms
Found on http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/marinebio/glossary.opq.html

organic

[adj] - of or relating to or derived from living organisms 2. [adj] - being or relating to or derived from or having properties characteristic of living organisms 3. [adj] - (chemistry) relating or belonging to the class of chemical compounds having a carbon basis 4. [adj] - (pathology) involving or affecting physiology or bodily...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=organic

Organic

Low output farming using rotations, clover, and very few artificial fertilisers, pesticides and antibiotics.
Found on http://www.lethamshank.co.uk/glossary/glossary.php?letter=O

Organic

substances such as proteins, sugars, wood and plastics with molecular structures containing carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds
Found on http://www.oasisenviro.co.uk/Glossary%20N%20to%20R.htm

Organic

originally meant “derived from living matter�. In chemistry it means chemicals containing carbon and hydrogen with other elements such as oxygen and nitrogen. Nowadays, organic commonly refers to food produced without the use of chemical fertilizers or pesticides - leading to the tautology organic vegetables!
Found on http://www.epaw.co.uk/EPT/glossary.html

Organic

compounds that contain carbon, which are often created as a result of a life process.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20722

organic

organic compound. Compare with inorganic compound. Compounds that contain carbon chemically bound to hydrogen. They often contain other elements (particularly O, N, halogens, or S). Organic compounds were once thought to be produced only by living things. We now know that any organic compound can be synthesized in the laboratory (although this can ...
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/o.shtml

organic

Being or composed of hydrocarbons or their derivatives, or matter of plant or animal origin. Contrast with inorganic.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20742

Organic

Pertaining to carbon
Found on http://www.roadsafeeurope.com/useful_info/Glossary

Organic

originating from living organisms. Organic chemicals contain carbon, hydrogen and sometimes other elements.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20796

Organic

Having properties relating to living organisms. Relating to the organs. (E.g. organic disease: disease of an organ, accompanied by structural changes.)
Found on http://www.dwp.gov.uk/medical/med_conditions/glossary.html

Organic

Relating to a body organ.
Found on http://www.gadsbywicks.co.uk/uploaded/3822.pdf

Organic

Organic: 1. A chemical compound that contains carbon. 2. Related to an organ. 3. Grown or prepared without the use of chemicals or pesticides, as in organic food.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=11780

Organic

A term designating any chemical compound which contains carbon and hydrogen.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933
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