orbit

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Gravity) Circular or elliptical path around a central object.

Orbit

Curved path, usually elliptical in shape, an object follows around a bigger object or a common center of mass.
Found on http://planetfacts.org/space-terms/

Orbit

In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved path of an object around a point in space, for example the orbit of a planet around the center of a star system, such as the Solar System. Orbits of planets are typically elliptical. But unlike the ellipse followed by a pendulum or an object attached to a spring, the central sun is at a focal poin...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit

ORBit

ORBit is a CORBA 2.4 compliant Object Request Broker (ORB). It features mature C, C++ and Python bindings, and less developed bindings for Perl, Lisp, Pascal, Ruby, and Tcl. Most of the code is distributed under the LGPL license, although the IDL compiler and utilities use the GPL. ORBit was originally written to serve as middleware for the GNOME ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ORBit

orbit

(from the article `ballistics`) A trajectory is the path of a shot, subject to the forces of gravity, drag, and lift. Under the sole influence of gravity, a trajectory is parabolic. ... The effect of the Coriolis force is an apparent deflection of the path of an object that moves within a rotating coordinate system. The object does ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/27

orbit

(from the article `eye, human`) The eye is protected from mechanical injury by being enclosed in a socket, or orbit, which is made up of portions of several of the bones of the ... The orbit is the bony cavity in the skull that houses the globe of the eye (eyeball), the muscles that move the eye (the extraocular muscles), the ... [2 ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/o/27

orbit

(or´bit) the bony cavity containing the eyeball and its associated muscles, vessels, and nerves; the ethmoid, frontal, lacrimal, nasal, palatine, sphenoid, and zygomatic bones and the maxilla contribute to its formation. the path of an electron around the nucleus of an atom. adj., or´bital., adj.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

orbit

[n] - the path of an electron around the nucleus of an atom 2. [n] - the (usually elliptical) path described by one celestial body in its revolution about another 3. [v] - move in an orbit, as of celestial bodies
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=orbit

Orbit

• (n.) The path described by a heavenly body in its periodical revolution around another body; as, the orbit of Jupiter, of the earth, of the moon. • (n.) An orb or ball. • (n.) The skin which surrounds the eye of a bird. • (n.) The cavity or socket of the skull in which the eye and its appendages are situated.Orbit: words in th...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/orbit/

orbit

noun the path of an electron around the nucleus of an atom
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

orbit

celestial orbit noun the (usually elliptical) path described by one celestial body in its revolution about another; `he plotted the orbit of the moon`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

orbit

(astronomy) Path of one body in space around another, such as the orbit of the Earth around the Sun or of the Moon around the Earth. Both bodies move around their common centre of mass. The movement of objects in orbit follows Kepler's laws, which apply to artificial satellites as well as ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005745.html

orbit

(eye) The socket in the skull that contains the eyeball (see eye), protective pads of fat, and various blood vessels, muscles, and nerves. An opening in the back of the orbit allows the optic nerve to pass from the eyeball into the brain.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/O/orbit_eye.html

Orbit

[anatomy] In anatomy, the orbit is the cavity or socket of the skull in which the eye and its appendages are situated. `Orbit` can refer to the bony socket, or it can also be used to imply the contents. In the adult human, the volume of the orbit is 30 ml, of which the eye occupies 6.5 ml. ==Structure== The orbits are conical or four-sided ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit_(anatomy)

Orbit

[dynamics] In mathematics, in the study of dynamical systems, an orbit is a collection of points related by the evolution function of the dynamical system. The orbit is a subset of the phase space and the set of all orbits is a partition of the phase space, that is different orbits do not intersect in the phase space. Understanding the prop...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit_(dynamics)

Orbit

[journal] Orbit is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering developments and results from the variety of medical disciplines that overlap and converge in the field of orbital disorders: ophthalmology, otolaryngology, reconstructive and maxillofacial surgery, endocrinology, radiology, radiotherapy and oncology, neurology, neuro-ophthalmology...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit_(journal)

Orbit

[mascot] Orbit is the name given to Major League Baseball`s Houston Astros mascot, a lime-green outer-space creature wearing an Astros jersey with antennae extending into baseballs. Orbit was the team`s official mascot from the 1990 through the 1999 seasons until the 2000 season, where Junction Jack was introduced as the team`s mascot with ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit_(mascot)

Orbit

[scratch] An orbit is a type of scratch used by turntablists. It is generally any scratch that incorporates both a forward and backward movement, or vice versa, of the record in sequence. == Creation == The orbit was developed by DJ Disk who incorporated the flare after being shown by DJ Q-Bert. == Technique == Usually when someone is refer...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit_(scratch)

orbit

[Verb] To move around the earth or sun in a curved path.
Example: The earth orbits the sun once every 24 hours.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Orbit

Or'bit noun [ Latin orbita a track or rut made by a wheel, course, circuit, from orbis a circle: confer French orbite . See 2d Orb .] 1. (Astron.) The path described by a heavenly body in its periodical revolution around another body; as, the orbit of ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/O/28

orbit

1. <astronomy> The path described by a heavenly body in its periodical revolution around another body; as, the orbit of Jupiter, of the earth, of the moon. ... 2. An orb or ball. 'Roll the lucid orbit of an eye.' (Young) ... 3. <anatomy> The cavity or socket of the skull in which the eye and its appendages are situated. ... 4. <zoolo...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

orbit

1) the path, relative to a specified frame of reference, described by the centre of mass of a satellite or other object in space, subjected solely to forces of natural origin, mainly the force of gravity 2) by extension, the path described by the centre of mass of an object in space subjected to forces of natural origin and occasional corrective fo...
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=725-11-07

orbit

A curved path followed by an object under the gravitational influence of another body. It is one of the conic section family of curves, which includes the circle, the ellipse, the parabola and the hyperbola. A closed orbit, such as that followed by a satellite going around Earth, has the shape of ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/O/orbit.html

Orbit

A scheduling method in which the advertiser's commercials are rotated among different programs and/o
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Television_%28TV%29/

ORBIT

An applications program run partially on the operational VAX which 'smooths' the Tevatron beam orbit by making adjustments to the correction dipoles. The program has many other functions all associated with controlling the beam position. Another program exists, called ORBIT Jr, which performs some of the same functions but runs entirely on the cons...
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html
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