negligence

An employer can be sued for compensation for industrial disease or injury but, for an action of negligence to succeed, it has to be proved that the job actually caused the disease, it could have been prevented by the assessment and monitoring of working conditions and that a good employer would thus have prevented it.

Negligence

a careless action, or lack of action, that causes someone entitled to rely on you to suffer loss or injury

negligence

[n] - the trait of neglecting responsibilities and lacking concern 2. [n] - failure to act with the prudence that a reasonable person would exercise under the same circumstances
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=negligence

Negligence

“The omission to do something which a reasonable man, guided upon those considerations which ordinarily regulate the conduct of human affairs, would do, or doing something which a prudent and reasonable man would not do� (Blythe v Birmingham Waterworks Co 1856).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20474

Negligence

A form of tort or breach of a legal duty of care where the victim is entitled to some form of compensation, eg damages for harm suffered.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20546

negligence

In law, doing some act that a `prudent and reasonable` person would not do, or omitting to do some act that such a person would do. Negligence may arise in respect of a person's duty towards an...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Negligence

Everyone owes a duty to take reasonable care not to injure or cause loss to his neighbour. If he fails to do so and the neighbour suffers damage as a result, the tort of negligence has been committed. The courts are constantly considering exactly what is reasonable and who is a neighbour, and it has been said that the categories of negligence are n...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20912

Negligence

To establish Negligence in the legal sense it is necessary to prove that the defendant owed the claimant a duty of care and that he breached that duty by failing to observe the standards of the reasonable person. If the claimant succeeds, compensation will be in the form of damages. (Claims resulting from road accidents are brought in the tort...
Found on http://www.elc.org.uk/pages/lawlegalglossary.htm

Negligence

The failure to perform an act that a reasonable person, guided by ordinary considerations, would do or the doing of an act that a reasonable person, exercising ordinary care, would not do under similar circumstances.
Found on http://www.own-it.org/knowledge/glossary-of-ip-terms

Negligence

When a legal duty of care has been breached by omission of a positive duty which leads to damage suffered by the Plaintiff. The question of negligence is one of fact.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20921

Negligence

Neg'li·gence noun [ French négligence , Latin negligentia .] The quality or state of being negligent; lack of due diligence or care; omission of duty; habitual neglect; heedlessness. 2. An act or instance of negligence or carelessness. « remarking his beauties, . . . I mus...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/N/11

negligence

The quality or state of being negligent; lack of due diligence or care; omission of duty; habitual neglect; heedlessness. ... 2. An act or instance of negligence or carelessness. 'remarking his beauties, . I must also point out his negligences and defects.' (Blair) ... 3. The omission of the care usual under the circumstances, being convertible wit...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

negligence

neglect noun the trait of neglecting responsibilities and lacking concern
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=negligence

negligence

(neg´lĭ-jens) in law, the failure to do something that a reasonable person of ordinary prudence would do in a certain situation or the doing of something that such a person would not do. Negligence may provide the basis for a lawsuit when there is a legal duty, as the duty of a health care worker to provide r...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Negligence

• (n.) The omission of the care usual under the circumstances, being convertible with the Roman culpa. A specialist is bound to higher skill and diligence in his specialty than one who is not a specialist, and liability for negligence varies acordingly. • (n.) An act or instance of negligence or carelessness. • (n.) The quality or st...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/negligence/

negligence

in law, the failure to meet a standard of behaviour established to protect society against unreasonable risk. Negligence is the cornerstone of tort ... [9 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/n/22

negligence

negligence 1. Habitually careless or irresponsible. 2. In law, guilty of failing to provide a proper or reasonable level of care.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2526/6

NEGLIGENCE

The careless actions of a person, or their failure to act, which places them at fault in causing or contributing to the injury or death of another. When that failure causes another person to suffer an injury or financial loss, that person may be entitled to just compensation through our civil justice system.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21681

Negligence

- The omission to do something which a reasonable man, guided by those ordinary considerations which ordinarily regulate human affairs, would do, or the doing of something which a reasonable and prudent man would not do. Negligence is the failure to use such care as a reasonably prudent and careful person would use under similar circumstances; it i...
Found on http://www.nysscpa.org/prof_library/guide.htm

negligence

negligence, in law, especially tort law, the breach of an obligation (duty) to act with care, or the failure to act as a reasonable and prudent person would under similar circumstances. For a plaintiff to recover damages, this action or failure must be the “proximate cause” of an injury,...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0835126.html

Negligence

The failure to use reasonable care. The doing of something which a reasonably prudent person would not do, or the failure to do something which a reasonably prudent person would do under like circumstances. A departure from what an ordinary reasonable member of the community would do in the same community. Negligence is a 'legal cause' of damage .....
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/n010.htm

Negligence

It refers to behaviour of a person which has caused an injury or damage to another person because of formers below standard, careless responsibility. In law, the negligence of the person is considered legal cause and can be tried in the court. Any prudent man with level head and brains, if does something which he or any other prudent man, ought not...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

negligence

n. failure to exercise the care toward others which a reasonable or prudent person would do in the circumstances, or taking action which such a reasonable person would not. Negligence is accidental as distinguished from "intentional torts" (assault or trespass, for example) or from crimes, but a crime can also constitute negligence, such as reckles...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=1314

negligence

In law, doing some act that a `prudent and reasonable` person would not do, or omitting to do some act that such a person would do. Negligence may arise in respect of a person's duty towards an individual or towards other people in general. Breach of the duty of care that results in reasonably foreseeable damage is a tort. Contributor...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0017638.html

negligence

An employer can be sued for compensation for industrial disease or injury but, for an action of negligence to succeed, it has to be proved that the job actually caused the disease, it could have been prevented by the assessment and monitoring of working conditions and that a good employer would thus have prevented it.
Found on http://rsi.org.uk/medical_glossary/medgloss2_N.html
No exact match found