Muck

Decomposed organic material, usually 20 to 50% organic matter mixed with mineral matter, dark in colour, and accumulated under poor drainage conditions.

muck

  1. any thick messy substance
  2. fecal matter of animals

Muck

Muck is a soil made up primarily of humus from drained swampland Muck may also refer to: ==Places== ==People== ==Games== ==Other uses== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muck

muck

(from the article `vegetable farming`) The soil stores mineral nutrients and water used by plants, as well as housing their roots. There are two general kinds of soils—mineral and the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/132

muck

[v] - remove muck, clear away muck, as in a mine
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=muck

Muck

• (v. t.) To manure with muck. • abbreviation of Amuck. • (n.) Vegetable mold mixed with earth, as found in low, damp places and swamps. • (a.) Like muck; mucky; also, used in collecting or distributing muck; as, a muck fork. • (n.) Money; -- in contempt. • (n.) Anything filthy or vile. • (n.) Dung in a moist s......
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/muck/

Muck

[gambling] Muck in gambling has multiple meanings. In poker, it most often refers to the pile of discarded cards into which players may throw their folded hands, and into which the dealer may place burned cards. It may also refer to the action of throwing a hand into the muck. The practice of mucking cards when discarding helps to ensure th...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muck_(gambling)

Muck

[soil] The word Muck has very much usage in the English Language, referring in some cases to agricultural soil, in others to dirt in general and to animal dung in particular. Origins probably from Norse, Danish and Proto-Germanic roots referring to cow dung. In the terminology of North American agriculture `Muck` is a soil made up primarily...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muck_(soil)

Muck

Muck (mŭk), abbreviation of Amuck . To run a muck . See Amuck .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/110

Muck

Muck adjective Like muck; mucky; also, used in collecting or distributing muck; as, a muck fork.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/110

Muck

Muck noun [ Icelandic myki ; akin to Dutch mög . Confer Midden .] 1. Dung in a moist state; manure. Bacon. 2. Vegetable mold mixed with earth, as found in low, damp places and swamps. 3. Anything filthy or vile. Spenser. 4. Mone...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/110

Muck

Muck transitive verb To manure with muck.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/110

muck

a soil consisting of partially decomposed plant remains where the decomposition has progressed to a point where the contributing plant species cannot be identified; an organic soil as opposed to mineral soils.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22043

Muck

Brickie term for mortar
Found on http://www.fmb.org.uk/find-a-builder/helpful-advice/jargon-buster/?locale=e

Muck

Brickie term for mortar.
Found on http://www.interbuilders.co.uk/glossary/m/muck.html

Muck

Muck is slang for filth or dirt; rubbish.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZM.HTM

Muck

Ore or rock that has been broken by blasting.
Found on http://www.insidemetals.com/index.php?view=mining_glossary

Muck

Ore or rock that has been broken by blasting.
Found on http://www.libertystaruranium.com/miningexplained/mining-geology-glossary/

Muck

Rock or waste.
Found on http://www.welshcoalmines.co.uk/Glossary.htm

Muck

The pile of folded and burned cards in front of the dealer. Example: 'His hand hit the muck so the dealer ruled it folded even though the guy wanted to get his cards back.' Also used as a verb. Example: 'He didn't have any outs so he mucked his hand.'
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21171

Muck

When used as a noun, this means the pile of folded and/or discarded cards. When spoken as a verb, at showdown time, it refers to returning a losing hand to the dealer facedown, so that other players do not see the cards.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20611
No exact match found