moon

  1. the natural satellite of the Earth
  2. any natural satellite of a planet

Moon

A naturally occurring satellite, or relatively large body, orbiting a planet.

Moon

A small natural body which orbits a larger one. A natural satellite. Capitalized, the Earth's natural satellite.

moon

[n] - any object resembling a moon 2. [n] - the natural satellite of the Earth 3. [n] - any natural satellite of a planet 4. [v] - be idle in a listless or dreamy way 5. [v] - expose one`s buttocks to
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=moon

Moon

Very important in the Celtic Calendar, more so than the sun. Used to plot the seasons and festivals. Great Lunar years marked with extra significance as they only occur every 22 years. See Calendar
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20686

Moon

The Earth's moon. Galileo observed the moon through a telescope and thought that the dark areas were seas. This is why some areas of the Moon are named as seas.A view of the Apollo 11 lunar module 'Eagle' as it returned from the surface of the moon to dock with the command module 'Columbia'. 21 July 1969Click on an item to paste into clipboard or u...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/m/o/moon/source.html

Moon

In mythology, the Moon has been revered by humans from very early times, and lunar myths are found among widely different races and cultures. These usually account for the waxing and waning of the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Moon

Moon (mōn) noun [ Middle English mone , Anglo-Saxon mōna ; akin to Dutch maan , Old Saxon & Old High German māno , German mond , Icelandic māni , Danish maane , Swedish måne , Goth. mēna , Lithu...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/98

Moon

Moon transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Mooned ; present participle & verbal noun Mooning .] To expose to the rays of the moon. « If they have it to be exceeding white indeed, they seethe it yet once more, after it hath be...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/98

Moon

Moon intransitive verb To act if moonstruck; to wander or gaze about in an abstracted manner. « Elsley was mooning down the river by himself.» C. Kingsley.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/98

moon

1. The celestial orb which revolves round the earth; the satellite of the earth; a secondary planet, whose light, borrowed from the sun, is reflected to the earth, and serves to dispel the darkness of night. The diameter of the moon is 2,160 miles, its mean distance from the earth is 240,000 miles, and its mass is one eightieth that of the earth. S...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

moon

noun any natural satellite of a planet; `Jupiter has sixteen moons`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=moon

Moon

• (n.) A secondary planet, or satellite, revolving about any member of the solar system; as, the moons of Jupiter or Saturn. • (v. t.) To expose to the rays of the moon. • (n.) The time occupied by the moon in making one revolution in her orbit; a month. • (n.) The celestial orb which revolves round the earth; the satellite of t...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/moon/

moon

any natural satellite orbiting a major planet. See satellite.
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/118

Moon

Earth`s sole natural satellite and nearest large celestial body. Known since prehistoric times, it is the brightest object in the sky after the Sun. ... [56 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/118

Moon

Moon, Wild Animals, Youth, and Hunting Greek: Artemis (goddess); earlier, goddess of the moon: Selene Latin: Diana (goddess); earlier, goddess of the moon: Luna The goddess of the moon and hunting, patroness of maidens. Symbols: the crescent, stag, and arrows.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/3359/2

Moon

HMS Moon was a British Algerine Class minesweeper of 950 tons displacement launched in 1943. HMS Moon was powered by two 3-drum type boilers providing a top speed of 16.5 knots. She carried a peacetime complement of 85 and between 104 and 138 in war. For defence she was armed with one 4-inch dual-purpose gun; four 40 mm anti-aircraft guns and two d...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RM.HTM

Moon

Moon is British slang for a month.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZM.HTM

Moon

[video game] Moon is a first-person shooter video game developed by Renegade Kid exclusively for the Nintendo DS. The game was originally set to be shipped in North America on November 18, 2008, but the developer later pushed back the release to January 13, 2009. It was also released on July 3, 2009 in Europe. The game`s publishing rights w...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_(video_game)

Moon

The Moon imaged through an 11-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain (30mm eyepiece) and attached Nikon 4-megapixel camera. Courtesy: Jim Wentworth, 'Fire in the Sky Observatory,' Brainerd, Minnesota Earth's only natural satellite and the only extraterrestrial body to have been visited by humans – 12 i...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/M/Moon.html

moon

moon, natural satellite of a planet (see satellite, natural) or dwarf planet, in particular, the single natural satellite of the earth.Sections in this article:IntroductionThe Earth-Moon SystemPhysical CharacteristicsBibliography
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0833913.html

Moon

The moon is the natural satellite of the earth. It is 3476 km in diameter and has a mass 1/8th that of the earth. It orbits the earth every 27.32 days.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AM.HTM

Moon

Type: Term Pronunciation: mūn Definitions: 1. Henry, English surgeon, 1845-1892. See: Moon molars, under molar
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=55992

moon

In astronomy, any natural satellite that orbits a planet. Mercury and Venus are the only planets in the Solar System not known to have moons
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005711.html

Moon

Click images to enlargeNatural satellite of Earth, 3,476 km/2,160 mi in diameter, with a mass 0.012 (approximately one-eightieth) that of Earth. Its surface gravity is only 0.16 (one-sixth) that of Earth. Its average distance from Earth is 384,400 km/238,855 mi, and it orbits in a west-to-east dire...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005709.html
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