Meander

A meander, in general, is a bend in a sinuous watercourse or river. A meander forms when moving water in a stream erodes the outer banks and widens its valley, and the inner part of the river has less energy and deposits silt. A stream of any volume may assume a meandering course, alternately eroding sediments from the outside of a bend and deposi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meander

meander

(from the article `folk dance`) ...branles circle on location, usually clockwise—the typical direction of northwest Europe. In chain dances the circle is not closed. A leader guides ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/60

meander

[n] - a curve in a stream
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=meander

Meander

• (n.) Fretwork. See Fret. • (n.) A tortuous or intricate movement. • (v. t.) To wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous. • (v. i.) To wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate. • (n.) A winding, crooked, or involved course; as, the meanders of the veins and arteries.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/meander/

meander

noun a bend or curve, as in a stream or river
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=meander

Meander

[1855] The SS ``Meander was an iron screw passenger steamship built for James Moss & Co. of Liverpool for the Moss Line. She was launched on 6 January 1855 by the Bristol yard of George Kelson Stothert & Co. She had two sisterships built at the same shipyard, the Scamander and Araxes``. ==History== Soon after completion, James Moss & Co. ch...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meander_(1855)

Meander

[art] A meander or meandros (Μαίανδρος) is a decorative border constructed from a continuous line, shaped into a repeated motif. Such a design is also called the Greek fret or Greek key design, although these are modern designations. On the one hand, the name `meander` recalls the twisting and turning path of the Maeander River in ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meander_(art)

Meander

[mathematics] In mathematics, a meander or closed meander is a self-avoiding closed curve which intersects a line a number of times. Intuitively, a meander can be viewed as a road crossing a river through a number of bridges. ==Meander== Given a fixed oriented line L in the Euclidean plane R2, a meander of order n is a non-self-intersecting...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meander_(mathematics)

Meander

[mythology] Meander, Maeander, Mæander, or Maiandros (Μαίανδρος) is a river in Greek mythology, patron deity of the Meander river (modern Büyük Menderes River) in Caria, southern Asia Minor (modern Turkey). He is one of the sons of Oceanus and Tethys, and is the father of Cyanee, Samia and Kalamos. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meander_(mythology)

Meander

Me·an'der intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Meandered ; present participle & verbal noun Meandering .] To wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate. « Five miles meandering with a mazy motion Through...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/37

Meander

Me·an'der noun [ Latin Maeander , orig., a river in Phrygia, proverbial for its many windings, Greek ...: confer French méandre .] 1. A winding, crooked, or involved course; as, the meanders of the veins and arteries. Sir M. Hale. « While lingering rivers in...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/37

Meander

Me·an'der transitive verb To wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous. Dryton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/37

Meander

A bend in a river - usually in the middle or lower course. The meander continually changes shape as the fast flowing current of water erodes the outside bank of the meander bend and deposition occurs in the slack water of the inside of the bend.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21748

Meander

A broad, looping bend in a river.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html

meander

A loop in a river.
Found on http://www.quick-facts.co.uk/earth/glossary.html

meander

A sharp bend, loop or turn in a stream
Found on http://www.ge-at.iastate.edu/glossary-of-geologic-terms/

Meander

a winding line shape sometimes found on vases.
Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

Meander

Broad, semicircular curves in a stream that develop as the stream erodes the outer bank of a curve a
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22392

meander

Broad, semicircular curves in a stream that develop as the stream erodes the outer bank of a curve and deposits sediment against the inner bank.
Found on http://www.scientificpsychic.com/etc/geology-glossary.html

meander

extreme U-bend in the course of a stream, usually occurring in a series. Meanders, named from the Menderes (historically known as the Maeander) River ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/60

meander

Loop-shaped curve in a river flowing sinuously across flat country. As a river flows, any curve in its course is accentuated (intensified) by the current. On the outside of the curve the velocity, and therefore the erosion, of the current is greatest. Here the river cuts into the outside bank, pr...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0007748.html

meander

meander 1. To follow an indirect route or course; especially, one with a series of twists and turns: 'Our local river meanders to the sea.' 2. To move in a leisurely way, or a slow leisurely walk or journey; especially, for pleasure or because of a lack of motivation: 'Last Sunday, we spent the whole day meandering through the park.' 3. A twist o...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1266/

meander

move or cause to move in a sinuous or circular course
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/151399

meander

move or cause to move in a sinuous or circular course
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/52061

MEANDER

One of a series of somewhat regular, sharp, sinuous curves, bends, loops, or turns produced by a stream, particularly in its lower course where it swings from side to side across its valley bottom.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22047
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