linkage

Tendency for certain genes tend to be inherited together, because they are on the same chromosome. Thus parental combinations of characters are found more frequently in offspring than non-parental. Linkage is measured by the percentage recombination between loci.

linkage

  1. an associative relation
  2. (genetics) traits that tend to be inherited together as a consequence of an association between their genes
  3. a mechanical system of rods or springs or pivots that transmits power or motion
  4. the act of linking things together

Linkage

The occurrence of two or more loci of interest on the same chromosome within 50 cM linkage distance of one another.
Found on http://www.cattlepages.com/dictionary/

Linkage

Linkage generally means `the manner or style of being united`, and can refer to: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linkage

linkage

(from the article `international relations`) ...method of containing Communist power through diplomatic accords and a flexible system of rewards and punishments by which Washington might ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/55

linkage

(lingk´әj) the connection between different atoms in a chemical compound, or the symbol representing it in structural formulas; see also bond. in genetics, the association of genes having loci on the same chromosome, which results in the tendency of a group of such nonallelic genes to be associ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

linkage

[n] - an associative relation 2. [n] - (genetics) traits that tend to be inherited together as a consequence of an association between their genes 3. [n] - a mechanical system of rods or springs or pivots that transmits power or motion 4. [n] - the act of linking things together
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=linkage

Linkage

• (n.) The act of linking; the state of being linked; also, a system of links. • (n.) A system of straight lines or bars, fastened together by joints, and having certain of their points fixed in a plane. It is used to describe straight lines and curves in the plane. • (n.) Manner of linking or of being linked; -- said of the union of...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/linkage/

linkage

<genetics> Tendency for two or more non-allelic genes to be inherited together, because they are located more or less closely on the same chromosome. ... Thus parental combinations of characters are found more frequently in offspring than nonparental. Linkage is measured by the percentage recombination between loci. ... (04 Jul 1999) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

linkage

gene linkage noun (genetics) traits that tend to be inherited together as a consequence of an association between their genes; all of the genes of a given chromosome are linked (where one goes they all go)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=linkage

Linkage

[horse] == Early racing career == At age two Linkage won his maiden in his second career start at Aqueduct Racetrack. Several months later won two different allowance races at Aqueduct and Laurel Park Racecourse. He then went on to win in the Forerunner Stakes at a mile and one eighth in August at Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Kentuck...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linkage_(horse)

Linkage

[linguistics] In linguistics, a linkage is a group of undoubtedly related languages for which no proto-language can be reconstructed. Malcolm Ross, who coined the term, defined it as `a group of communalects which have arisen by dialect differentiation” {harv|Ross|1988|p=8}. ==Principle== Linkages are formed when languages emerged histori...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linkage_(linguistics)

Linkage

[mechanical] A mechanical linkage is an assembly of bodies connected to manage forces and movement. The movement of a body, or link, is studied using geometry so the link is considered to be rigid. The connections between links are modeled as providing ideal movement, pure rotation or sliding for example, and are called joints. A linkage mo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linkage_(mechanical)

Linkage

[mechanics] This category contains articles related to the flora of the Cayman Islands. Taxa of the lowest rank are always included. Higher taxa are included only if endemic. This category follows the World Geographical Scheme for Recording Plant Distributions. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linkage_(mechanics)

Linkage

[policy] Linkage was a policy pursued by the United States of America, championed by Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, during the 1970s period of Cold War Détente which aimed to persuade the Soviet Union and Communist China to co-operate in restraining revolutions in the Third World in return for concessions in nuclear and economic fields...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linkage_(policy)

Linkage

[software] In programming languages, particularly C++, linkage describes how names can or can not refer to the same entity throughout the whole program or one single translation unit. The static keyword is used in C to restrict the visibility of a function or variable to its translation unit. This is also valid in C++. (C++ 98/03 deprecated...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linkage_(software)

Linkage

Link'age (lĭnk'aj; 48) noun 1. The act of linking; the state of being linked; also, a system of links. 2. (Chemistry) Manner of linking or of being linked; -- said of the union of atoms or radicals in the molecule. 3. (Geom.) A system of straight lines or b...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/46

Linkage

a measure of how frequently two genes found on the same chromosome remain together during gamete (egg or sperm) formation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21448

Linkage

Genes located close to one another on the same chromosome that tend to be inherited together.
Found on http://www.sheepusa.org/

linkage

In genetics, the association between two or more genes that tend to be inherited together because they are on the same chromosome. The closer together they are on the chromosome, the less likely they are to be separated by crossing over (one of the processes of recombination) and they are then described as being `tightly linked`
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0008058.html

linkage

in mechanical engineering, a system of solid, usually metallic, links (bars) connected to two or more other links by pin joints (hinges), sliding ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/55

Linkage

Interconnection. ESF uses the term to refer to the stitching together of parcels of land to create large blocks that will help sustain a greater diversity of species. Some animals, like bobcats, need the considerable room to roam that can be provided by linked lands.
Found on http://www.elkhornslough.org/education/sloughspeak.htm

Linkage

Linkage: The tendency for genes and other genetic markers to be inherited together because of their location near one another on the same chromosome. A gene is a functional physical unit of heredity that can be passed from parent to child. All genes in humans are pieces of DNA. Most genes contain information for making a specific protein. The term ...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=4165

Linkage

Pudovkin, a student of Kulechov, developed his own theory of film montage now referred to by the term `linkage`. In direct contrast to Eisenstein's collision montage Pudovkin promulgated the idea that film sequences, various shots and various scenes, should be combined in a consistent narrative establishing a story-line and allowing the audience to...
Found on http://www.allmovie.com/glossary/term/linkage

Linkage

See forward linkage and backward linkage.
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/l.html
No exact match found