limerick

  1. port city in southwestern Ireland
  2. a humorous verse form of 5 anapestic lines with a rhyme scheme aabba

Limerick

==Geography and political subdivisions== There are 102,161 people living in the Limerick City Metropolitan District. On 1 June 2014 following the merger of Limerick City and County Council a new Metropolitan District of Limerick was formed within the united council which extended the city area. The Metropolitan District includes the city urban are...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limerick

Limerick

A five-line comic verse following the syllable pattern 8 8 6 6 8 with the rhyme scheme a a b b a. Early limericks, such as the nonsense verse of Edward Lear, repeat line 1 in line 5. However, recent verse does not always follow this model.
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

limerick

[n] - port city in southwestern Ireland 2. [n] - a humorous verse form of 5 anapestic lines with a rhyme scheme aabba
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=limerick

Limerick

• (n.) A nonsense poem of five anapestic lines, of which lines 1, 2, and 5 are of there feet, and rime, and lines 3 and 4 are of two feet, and rime; as --There was a young lady, Amanda,/Whose Ballades Lyriques were quite fin de/Si/cle, I deem/But her Journal Intime/Was what sent her papa to Uganda.//
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/limerick/

limerick

noun a humorous verse form of 5 anapestic lines with a rhyme scheme aabba
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Limerick

(county) County of the Republic of Ireland, in the province of Munster; county town Limerick; area 2,690 sq km/1,038 sq mi; population (2002) 175,200. The principal river is the Shannon, and towns include Abbeyfeale, Kilmallock, Newcastle West, and Rathkeale. Limerick is hilly ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0020126.html

Limerick

(town) County town of County Limerick and fourth-largest city in the Republic of Ireland, on the Shannon estuary; population (2002) 87,000. The city is divided into three parts: English Town, which is the old city on King's Island (an island in the Shannon estuary); Irish T...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0004517.html

Limerick

[Dáil Éireann constituency] == History and boundaries == === 1923–1948 === The constituency was first created as a 7 seater under the Electoral Act 1923, for the 1923 general election to Dáil Éireann, whose members formed the 4th Dáil. It succeeded the constituencies of Limerick City–Limerick East and Kerry–Limerick West which we...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limerick_(Dáil_Éireann_constituency)

Limerick

[Parliament of Ireland constituency] ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limerick_(Parliament_of_Ireland_constituency)

Limerick

[poetry] The following limerick is of unknown origin: Gershon Legman, who compiled the largest and most scholarly anthology, held that the true limerick as a folk form is always obscene, and cites similar opinions by Arnold Bennett and George Bernard Shaw, describing the clean limerick as a `periodic fad and object of magazine contests, rar...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limerick_(poetry)

Limerick

Lim'er·ick noun [ Said to be from a song with the same verse construction, current in Ireland, the refrain of which contains the place name Limerick .] A nonsense poem of five anapestic lines, of which lines 1, 2, and 5 are of there feet, and rime, and lines 3 and 4 are of two feet, and rime; as --...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/43

Limerick

A five-line closed-form poem in which the first two lines consist of anapestic trimeter, which in tu
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

limerick

a fixed verse form appearing first in The History of Sixteen Wonderful Old Women (1820), popularized by Edward Lear, and rhyming aabba, where a-lines have five feet and the b-lines three feet, and where the first and last lines end with the same word (a practice dropped in the 20th century). A limerick has been defined as 'A comic poem consisting o...
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

Limerick

A fixed verse form appearing first in the history of sixteen wonderful old women (1820), popularized
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

Limerick

A light, humorous style of fixed form poetry, usually of five lines and a subject matter which is silly.
Found on http://www.word-mart.com/html/glossary2.html

limerick

a popular form of short, humorous verse that is often nonsensical and frequently ribald. It consists of five lines, rhyming aabba, and the dominant ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/51

Limerick

aabba.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary299.php

Limerick

county borough, port, and chief town of County Limerick, west-central Ireland, occupying both banks and King`s Island of the River Shannon at the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/51

Limerick

county, southwestern Ireland, in the province of Munster. Its northern boundary, with County Clare, is the River Shannon and its estuary. The River ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/51

limerick

Five-line humorous verse, often nonsensical, which first appeared in England in about 1820 and was popularized by English writer Edward Lear. An example is:`There was a young lady of Riga, Who...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

limerick

Five-line humorous verse, often nonsensical, which first appeared in England in about 1820 and was popularized by English writer Edward Lear. An example is: `There was a young lady of Riga, Who rode with a smile on a tiger; They returned from the ride With the lady inside, And the smile on the face of the tiger.`
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0017436.html

Limerick

Form of light verse consisting of five lines and rhymed: a-a-b-b-a. The first, second and fifth lines contain three feet while the third and fourth lines contain two feet. The form was popularised by the Victorian poet Edward Lear. Lear often used the same word at the end of the first and fifth lines e.g.
There was an old person of Dean
Who d...
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

Limerick

Limerick (lim'urik) , county (1991 pop. 161,956), 1,037 sq mi (2,686 sq km), SW Republic of Ireland. Limerick is the county seat. The region is an agricultural plain lying S of the Shannon estuary. The Golden Vale in the eastern part of the county and the Shannon bank are especially fertile. Dai...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0829800.html

Limerick

Limerick, city (1991 pop. 56,083), seat of Co. Limerick, SW Republic of Ireland, at the head of the Shannon estuary. The city has a port with two docks. The primary imports are grain, timber, and coal; exports include produce and fish. Limerick's industries include salmon fishing, food processing, f...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0829801.html
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