Lift

when the wind hits the leeward side of the sail and lifts the front par towards the helm

Lift

That component of the aerodynamic force which is perpendicular to the direction of a body's travel, directed vertically upwards or downwards (negative lift)

Lift

To add life to a line or scene.

Lift

In a sanitary landfill, a compacted layer of solid waste and the top layer of cover material.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/OCEPAterms/

lift

[n] - a wave that lifts the surface of the water or ground 2. [n] - a device worn in a shoe or boot to make the wearer look taller or to correct a shortened leg 3. [n] - one of the layers forming the heel of a shoe or boot 4. [n] - the act of giving temporary assistance 5. [n] - a ride in a car 6. [n] - the act of raising...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=lift

Lift

Section of stage floor that can be raised or lowered or tilted to provide differing levels of acting area, or to enable changes of setting to be made in the stage basement. Also Known as a bridge.
Found on http://www.queens-theatre.co.uk/technical/glossaryoftheatreterms.htm

Lift

1) To boost gain of audio at a particular band of frequencies with an equalizer.
2) An elevation device in the star trek series of TV programs.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Lift

In the lever escapement, the configuration of the mating faces of the pallets and escape-wheel teeth which ensures that impulse is given with just the right degree of interference between their respective paths.   In the English or side lever, the teeth come to a sharp point and the pallets are sole
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20450

Lift

The lifting force on a flying object (in particular, a wing or an aircraft), due to its motion relative to the surrounding air. Lift is one of the four forces sensed by an airplane, the others being drag, thrust and weight.The lift generated by a wing is based on the principle that the pressure in a fluid decreases as its velocity increases (Bernou...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/l/i/lift/source.html

Lift

(1) The component in a vertical, upward direction in straight and level flight of the resultant force created by the relative wind acting on the lifting surfaces of an aeroplane. (2) The total buoyancy of an airship.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

Lift

Lift (lĭft) noun [ Anglo-Saxon lyft air. See Loft .] The sky; the atmosphere; the firmament. [ Obsolete or Scot.]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/39

Lift

Lift (lĭft) transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Lifted ; present participle & verbal noun Lifting .] [ Icelandic lypta , from lopt air; akin to Swedish lyfta to lift, Danish löfte , German
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/39

Lift

Lift (lĭft) intransitive verb 1. To try to raise something; to exert the strength for raising or bearing. « Strained by lifting at a weight too heavy.» Locke. 2. To rise; to become or appear raised or elevated; as, the fog lifts ; the land ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/39

Lift

Lift noun 1. Act of lifting; also, that which is lifted. 2. The space or distance through which anything is lifted; as, a long lift . Bacon. 3. Help; assistance, as by lifting; as, to give one a lift in a wagon. [ Colloq.] « The goat gives the fox...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/39

lift

1. Act of lifting; also, that which is lifted. ... 2. The space or distance through which anything is lifted; as, a long lift. ... 3. Help; assistance, as by lifting; as, to give one a lift in a wagon. 'The goat gives the fox a lift.' (L'Estrange) ... 4. That by means of which a person or thing lifts or is lifted; as: A hoisting machine; an elevato...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

lift

raise noun the act of raising something; `he responded with a lift of his eyebrow`; `fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=lift

lift

verb raise in rank or condition; `The new law lifted many people from poverty`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=lift

Lift

An increase in securities prices, as shown by some economic indicator.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosl.htm

Lift

• (n.) A lift gate. See Lift gate, below. • (v. t.) To collect, as moneys due; to raise. • (n.) Help; assistance, as by lifting; as, to give one a lift in a wagon. • (n.) A handle. • (v. t.) To steal; to carry off by theft (esp. cattle); as, to lift a drove of cattle. • (n.) A layer of leather in the heel. • (n.) ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/lift/

lift

(from the article `fluid mechanics`) If an aircraft wing, or airfoil, is to fulfill its function, it must experience an upward lift force, as well as a drag force, when the aircraft is ... ...instruments developed in the 18th century for research into ballistics. Cayley was also a pioneer of aircraft design, explaining that a successful...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/49

lift

(from the article `rigging`) ...fore-and-aft sails, and sails, such as jibs, are manipulated for trimming to the wind and for making or shortening sail are known as the running ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/49

lift

(from the article `figure skating`) Lifts are among the more spectacular elements of pairs skating. A basic lift is the overhead lift, in which the man raises his partner off the ice ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/49

LIFT

[nonprofit] LIFT is a national non-profit organization whose mission is to ”combat poverty and expand opportunity” for all people in the United States. Every year, LIFT trains a corps of student volunteers to assist low-income individuals to secure housing, income, healthcare, education, and other necessities. LIFT has no eligibility re...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LIFT_(nonprofit)

Lift

[soaring] Lift is a meteorological phenomenon used as an energy source by soaring aircraft and soaring birds. The most common human application of lift is in sport and recreation. The three air sports that use soaring flight are: gliding, hang gliding and paragliding. Energy can be gained by using rising air from four sources: In dynamic so...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lift_(soaring)

Lift

Lift is slang for arrest or capture.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZL.HTM
No exact match found