lever

  1. a rigid bar pivoted about a fulcrum
  2. a simple machine that gives a mechanical advantage when given a fulcrum

Lever

[surname] Lever is a surname. Notable people with the surname include: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lever_(surname)

Lever

[disambiguation] A lever is a mechanical device to multiply force. Lever may also refer to: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lever_(disambiguation)

lever

[Noun] Something that can be used to make people do what you want them to do, rather than what they want to do. Also means a handle on a machine or a bar that you can wedge under a heavy object to make it move.
Example: The company used the threat of redundancies as a lever to persuade employees to settle for less pay.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

lever

[n] - a simple machine that gives a mechanical advantage when given a fulcrum 2. [n] - a flat metal tumbler in a lever lock 3. [n] - a rigid bar pivoted about a fulcrum
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=lever

Lever

One of the basic tools that date from prehistoric times. Simply a beam (lever) is used to move a load with a fulcrum (pivot) and an applied force. The position of the three determines the mechanical advantage.First Class LeverWith this type of lever the fulcrum is situated between the load and the applied force.Example: Pliers.Second Class LeverWit...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/l/e/lever/source.html

Lever

Lev'er (lē'vẽr) adjective [ Old compar. of leve or lief .] More agreeable; more pleasing. [ Obsolete] Chaucer. To be lever than . See Had as lief , under Had .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/34

Lever

Lev'er adverb Rather. [ Obsolete] Chaucer. « For lever had I die than see his deadly face.» Spenser.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/34

Lever

Le'ver (lē'vẽr or lĕv'ẽr; 277) noun [ Middle English levour , Old French leveor , prop., a lifter, from French lever to raise, Latin levare ; akin to levis light in weight, English levity , and perhaps to English light not h...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/34

lever

1. <mechanics> A rigid piece which is capable of turning about one point, or axis (the fulcrum), and in which are two or more other points where forces are applied; used for transmitting and modifying force and motion. Specif, a bar of metal, wood, or other rigid substance, used to exert a pressure, or sustain a weight, at one point of its le...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

lever

noun a rigid bar pivoted about a fulcrum
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=lever

lever

noun a flat metal tumbler in a lever lock
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=lever

Lever

• (a.) More agreeable; more pleasing. • (adv.) Rather. • (n.) A rigid piece which is capable of turning about one point, or axis (the fulcrum), and in which are two or more other points where forces are applied; -- used for transmitting and modifying force and motion. Specif., a bar of metal, wood, or other rigid substance, used to e...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/lever/

lever

simple machine used to amplify physical force. All early people used the lever in some form, for moving heavy stones or as digging sticks for land ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/40

lever

insulating tool used to open the sheath of a cable or to pry the covering off conductors
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=651-06-02

lever

Levers form one of the most important groups of simple machines, devices that enable energy to be used in the most advantageous way. At its simplest a lever is a rigid bar that can be turned freely round a fixed point (known as the fulcrum), and it is surprising what such a simple device can achieve...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/L/lever.html

lever

lever, simple machine consisting of a bar supported at some stationary point along its length and used to overcome resistance at a second point by application of force at a third point. The stationary point of a lever is known as its fulcrum. The term lever is also applied to a projecting piece that...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0829558.html

Lever

A lever is a simple machine, usually consisting of a rigid bar or rod, designed to rotate about a fixed point called the fulcrum. The effect of any force applied to a lever is to rotate the lever about the fulcrum. The rotational force is in direct proportion to the distance between the fulcrum and the applied force. For example, a mass of 1 kg, tw...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GL.HTM

lever

Type: Term Pronunciation: lev′ĕr, lēv′ Definitions: 1. An instrument used to lift or pry.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=49215

lever

Simple machine consisting of a rigid rod pivoted at a fixed point called the fulcrum, used for shifting or raising a heavy load or applying force. Levers are classified into orders according to where the effort is applied, and the load-moving force developed, in relation to the position of the fu...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0017416.html

Lever

A lever (ər or ər) is a machine consisting of a beam or rigid rod pivoted at a fixed hinge, or fulcrum. It is one of the six simple machines identified by Renaissance scientists. The word comes from the French lever, `to raise`, cf. a levant. A lever amplifies an input force to provide a greater output force, which is said to provide leverage......
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lever
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