LEAD

Live Early Adoption and Demonstration [W3C]

Lead

Payment of a financial obligation earlier than is expected or required.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20047

Lead

With respect to Radiation Protection, lead together with perhaps concrete, is the most likely shielding material for attenuating X-Rays and Gamma Rays . It has a density approximately 11 times greater than that of water and is easily formed into sheets and interlocking bricks. For example, 4 cm lead will attenuate Co-60 gamma rays to 1/10th of the ...
Found on http://www.ionactive.co.uk/glossary.html

lead

[n] - a soft heavy toxic malleable metallic element 2. [n] - the angle between the direction a gun is aimed and the position of a moving target (correcting for the flight time of the missile) 3. [n] - (baseball) the position taken by a base runner preparing to advance to the next base 4. [n] - a news story of major importance 5. ...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=lead

Lead

The musical instrument that plays the melody of the tune, including the vocal.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Lead

A cable for carrying The guitars electrical signal. Also A term for single note playing or soloing
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

Lead

Photograph of the ore galena courtesy of MineraliteLead is a soft, malleable and ductile metal. Lead oxidises readily in moist air, is stable to oxygen and water, but dissolves in nitric acid. It is a poor electrical and thermal conductor but has reasonable corrosion resistance. Applications for this metal are wide and varied; for example, its rela...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/l/e/lead/source.html

lead

(pronounced ‘leed`) One of the set of solid, formed conductors or wires that extend from a component and provide a mechanical and electrical connection. See pin.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870

LEAD

Lead Education Abatement Design Group
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20895

Lead

A malleable metal once extensively used for flashings.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20933

Lead

List of lead illustrations - a naturally occurring metal, the first to be smelted by man some 4000 years ago, and long used by the building industry for both practical and aesthetic purposes. Old lead can be an important historic document, there is a long tradition of inscribing into lead. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20935

Lead

A softish, heavy metal, with many applications in building. Used for covering flat or low-pitched roofs, for flashing, lining box gutters, and sometimes for rainwater hoppers and downpipes. It can also be used for ridging. If properly designed, it is an excellent material for most roofing work. Related Words: Box gutter; Down pipe; Hopper head
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20938

Lead

Lead (lĕd) noun [ Middle English led , leed , lead , Anglo-Saxon leád ; akin to Dutch lood , Middle High German lōt , German loth plummet, sounding lead, small weight, Swedish & Danish lod . √123.] 1. (Chemistry...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/22

Lead

Lead transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Leaded ; present participle & verbal noun Leading .] 1. To cover, fill, or affect with lead; as, continuous firing leads the grooves of a rifle. 2. (Print.)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/22

Lead

Lead (lēd) transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Led (lĕd); present participle & verbal noun Leading .] [ Middle English leden , Anglo-Saxon lǣdan (akin to Old Saxon lēdian , Dutch...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/22

Lead

Lead intransitive verb 1. To guide or conduct, as by accompanying, going before, showing, influencing, directing with authority, etc.; to have precedence or preëminence; to be first or chief; -- used in most of the senses of lead , transitive verb 2. To...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/22

Lead

Lead noun 1. The act of leading or conducting; guidance; direction; as, to take the lead ; to be under the lead of another. « At the time I speak of, and having a momentary lead , . . . I am sure I did my country important service .» Burke.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/22

lead

1. To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some physical contact connection; as, a father leads a child; a jockey leads a horse with a halter; a dog leads a blind man. 'If a blind man lead a blind man, both fall down in the ditch.' (Wyclif (Matt. Xv. 14)) 'They thrust him out of the city, and led him unto the brow of the hill.' (Luke iv. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

lead

track noun evidence pointing to a possible solution; `the police are following a promising lead`; `the trail led straight to the perpetrator`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=lead

lead

lede noun the introductory section of a story; `it was an amusing lead-in to a very serious matter`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=lead

Lead

Payment of a financial obligation earlier than is expected or required.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosl.htm

lead

(Pb) (lēd) a chemical element, atomic number 82, atomic weight 207.19. Excessive ingestion or absorption causes lead poisoning.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

lead

(lēd) a pair of electrodes attached to a wire, used in recording changes in electric potential, created by activity of an organ, such as the heart (electrocardiography) or brain (electroencephalography).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Lead

• (n.) The course of a rope from end to end. • (n.) the distance of haul, as from a cutting to an embankment. • (n.) An article made of lead or an alloy of lead • (v. t.) To tend or reach in a certain direction, or to a certain place; as, the path leads to the mill; gambling leads to other vices. • (v. t.) To go or to be in...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/lead/

lead

(from the article `sea ice`) ...small (20–100 m [about 66–330 feet] across) to giant (greater than 10 km [about 6 miles] across). As the ice drifts, it often breaks apart, and ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/25
No exact match found