Law

Law is a term which does not have a universally accepted definition, but one definition is that law is a system of rules and guidelines which are enforced through social institutions to govern behaviour. Laws can be made by legislatures through legislation (resulting in statutes), the executive through decrees and regulations, or judges through bi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law

LAW

The combination of those rules and principles of conduct promulgated by legislative authority, derived from court decisions and established by local custom.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21681

law

[n] - the collection of rules imposed by authority 2. [n] - legal document setting forth rules governing a particular kind of activity 3. [n] - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature 4. [n] - a rule or body of rules of conduct inherent in human nature and essential to or binding upon human society 5. ...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=law

LAW

Light Antitank Weapon. Hopefully no-one you're skirmishing against will have one of these...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20524

law

Body of rules and principles under which justice is administered or order enforced in a state or nation. In Western Europe there are two main systems: Roman law and English law. US law is a modified...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

law

natural law; scientific law. Natural laws summarize patterns that recur in a large amount of data. Unlike human laws, natural laws don't forbid or permit; they describe.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/l.shtml

Law

Mathematical statement of a relationship that is always the same.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/1002-Law

LAW

Light Anti-Armor Weapon
Found on http://www.jedsite.info/index.html

Law

The system made up of rules established by an act of parliament, custom or practice enjoining or prohibiting certain action (see also Common Law)
Found on http://www.hmcourts-service.gov.uk/infoabout/glossary/legal.htm

Law

Law (la) noun [ Middle English lawe , laghe , Anglo-Saxon lagu , from the root of English lie : akin to Old Saxon lag , Icelandic lög , Swedish lag , Danish lov ; confer Latin lex , English legal . A law is that which i...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/21

Law

Law transitive verb Same as Lawe , transitive verb [ Obsolete]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/21

Law

Law interj. [ Confer La .] An exclamation of mild surprise. [ Archaic or Low]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/21

law

A scientific principle that invariably holds true under specificconditions, for instance, the law of magnetism states that likemagnetic poles repel one another, while opposite poles attract. ... See: hypothesis, theory. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

law

noun a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; `the laws of thermodynamics`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=law

law

(law) a uniform or constant fact or principle. law of independent assortment see Mendel's laws. law of segregation see Mendel's laws.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

law

(from the article `science, philosophy of`) A second difficulty for Hempel`s account resulted from his candid admission that he was unable to offer a full analysis of the notion of a scientific ... Similar uncertainties affect recent discussions of scientific laws. As already noted, logical empiricism faced a difficult problem in distin...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/23

law

the discipline and profession concerned with the customs, practices, and rules of conduct of a community that are recognized as binding by the ... [28 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/23

law

Enforceable rules of conduct.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21177

law

law, rules of conduct of any organized society, however simple or small, that are enforced by threat of punishment if they are violated. Modern law has a wide sweep and regulates many branches of conduct.Sections in this article:IntroductionDevelopment of Early LawRoman Law and Its InfluenceAnglo-Am...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0829083.html

Law

(in Kant) 'Every formula which expresses the necessity of an action is called a law' (Kant). -- P. A.S.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/l.html

Law

Rules established by a governing authority to institute and maintain orderly coexistence. An act of Congress (state legislature) that has been signed by the president (governor) or passed over his veto by Congress. Public bills, when signed, become public laws, and are cited by the letters 'PL' and a hyphenated number. The two digits before the h.....
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/l009.htm

Law

(n) Law is the written Statute, ordinance, regulation, methods endorsed by the government or authority to regulate the governance of the land by deciding the rights and authorities of the people of the land
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

law

n. 1) any system of regulations to govern the conduct of the people of a community, society or nation, in response to the need for regularity, consistency and justice based upon collective human experience. Custom or conduct governed by the force of the local king were replaced by laws almost as soon as man learned to write. The earliest lawbook wa...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=1111

law

Type: Term Pronunciation: law Definitions: 1. A principle or rule. 2. A statement of fact detailing a sequence or relation of phenomena that is invariable under given conditions.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=48131

law

Body of rules and principles under which justice is administered or order enforced in a state or nation. In Western Europe there are two main systems: Roman law and English law. US law is a modified form of English law. Roman law The legal system of ancient Rome is now the basis of civil law, one of the main European legal systems. It began und...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0004430.html
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