lamina

Flat sheet; as in basal lamina.

Lamina

Leaf blade.

lamina

Any broad and flattened region of a plant or alga, which allows for increased photosynthetic surface area.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_8.html

lamina

[n] - a thin plate or layer (especially of bone or mineral)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=lamina

Lamina

The blade of a leaf.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20637

Lamina

Subunit of a laminate consisting of one or more adjacent plies of the same material with identical orientation.
Found on http://www.komprex.com/Glossary/index.htm

Lamina

Lamina: A plate or layer. For example, the lamina arcus vertebrae, usually just called the lamina, are plates of bone in each vertebral body.
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=6208

Lamina

Lam'i·na (lăm'ĭ*nȧ) noun ; plural Latin Laminæ (- nē) English Laminas (-nȧz). [ Latin confer Lamella .] 1. A thin plate or scale; a layer or coat lying over another; -- said of thin plates or platelike substances, as of bone or mine...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/L/9

lamina

Flat sheet, as in basal lamina. ... (18 Nov 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

lamina

noun a thin plate or layer (especially of bone or mineral)
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=lamina

lamina

(lam´ĭ-nә) a thin, flat plate or stratum of a composite structure; called also layer. vertebral lamina.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Lamina

• (n.) A thin plate or scale; a layer or coat lying over another; -- said of thin plates or platelike substances, as of bone or minerals. • (n.) The blade of a leaf; the broad, expanded portion of a petal or sepal of a flower. • (n.) A thin plate or scale; specif., one of the thin, flat processes composing the vane of a feather.Lamin...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/lamina/

lamina

(from the article `sedimentary rock`) ...normally greater than one centimetre in thickness and visibly separable from superjacent (overlying) and subjacent (underlying) beds. `Strata` ... There is also a tendency for many types of metamorphic rocks to become laminated, and the separate laminae may have distinct chemical compos...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/10

lamina

(from the article `nervous system, human`) The gray matter of the spinal cord is composed of nine distinct cellular layers, or laminae, traditionally indicated by Roman numerals. Laminae I to ... The metathalamus is composed of the medial and lateral geniculate bodies, or nuclei. Fibres of the optic nerve end in the lateral geniculate b...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/10

lamina

(from the article `leaf`) Typically, a leaf consists of a broad, expanded blade (the lamina), attached to the plant stem by a stalklike petiole. Leaves are, however, quite ... ...provides a connection from the stem to permit sap to enter the leaf and the products of photosynthesis (carbohydrates) to be transported from the ... ...are...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/l/10

lamina

lamina (s), laminae (pl)
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1143/

LAMINA

The flattened or arched part of the vertebral arch, forming the roof of the spinal canal.
Found on http://www.aans.org/Media/Glossary-of-Terminology

Lamina

The part of a leaf which is flattened, to a greater or lesser degree. As the Leaf Blade.
Found on http://badmanstropicalfish.com/glossary.html

lamina

a thin, flat organ or part, usually main upper surface of thallus.
Found on http://www.anbg.gov.au/glossary/webpubl/lichglos.htm

Lamina

The lamina is the blade on the leaf on either side of the midrib on flowering plants. It is usually the primary organ of photosynthesis.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/BL.HTM

lamina

Type: Term Pronunciation: lam′i-nă, lam′i-nē Synonyms: plate1
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=47712

lamina

In flowering plants (angiosperms), the blade of the leaf on either side of the midrib. The lamina is generally thin and flattened, and is usually the primary organ of photosynthesis. It has a network of veins through which water and nutrients are conducted. More generally, a lamina is any thin, flat plant structure, such as the thallus of many seaw...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006957.html

LAMINA

Any thin bone. The lamina of the spine (arcus vertebrae) is a thin bone plate extending posteriorly from the pedicles and fusing to provide the dorsal portion of the neural arch (surrounding the spinal cord), forming the base for the spinous process.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21447

lamina

Latin = plate, either a layer of nervous tissue, like the laminae of the lateral geniculate body, or a connective tissue membrane, like lamina cribrosa sclerae, or of bone, as in vertebral laminae; hence, laminectomy = lamina + Greek ektome = excision - excision of the vertebral laminae to give access to the spinal cord; adjective - laminar.
Found on http://www.anatomy.usyd.edu.au/glossary/glossary.cgi?

lamina

(lam;u1-nua) A thin plate of bone that extends superiorly from the body of a vertebra to form either side of the arch of a vertebra.
Found on http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/abio/glossary.mhtml
No exact match found