irony

  1. witty language used to convey insults or scorn
  2. incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
  3. a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs

Irony

Contained in much theatre. When a word or action implies or conveys the opposite meaning to that we expect.

Irony

[framework] Irony is a parser generator framework for language implementation on the .NET platform. Unlike most existing yacc/lex-style solutions, it does not employ code generation of a scanner/parser from grammars written in an external DSL. The grammars for the target language are coded directly in C# instead. The framework implements a ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony_(framework)

Irony

This is `The dissimulation of ignorance practised by Socrates as a means of confuting an adversary`. Socrates would pretend to be ignorant of the topic under discussion, to draw out the inherent nonsense in the arguments of his interlocutors. The Chambers Dictionary defines it as `a means by which a questioner pretends to know less than a respo......
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony

Irony

[disambiguation] Irony is a literary or rhetorical device, in which there is an incongruity or discordance between what one says or does. Irony or Ironic may also refer to: ==Music== ===Songs=== ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony_(disambiguation)

Irony

[Wonder Girls song] The Wonder Begins is the debut single and mini album by the South Korean girl group Wonder Girls, produced by Park Jin-young. It was released on February 13, 2007 by JYP Entertainment. It is also known by `Irony` which is the title song with the other name from this record. Three tracks, including `Bad Boy`, `It`s Not Lo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony_(Wonder_Girls_song)

Irony

Originally a term in rhetoric, irony characterized a statement where the intended meaning is the opposite of what is literally said. Over time, the term has widened to designate a situation characterized by an opposite or contradictory meaning or effect.
Found on http://faculty.cua.edu/johnsong/comedy/pages/terms.html

Irony

expression of something which is contrary to the intended meaning; the words say one thing but mean another.
*Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

Irony

Figure of speech in which the ordinary meaning of the words is more or less the opposite of what the poet intends.
In his poem Don Juan, Byron makes great use of irony. Don Juan  is also ironically dedicated to Robert Southey and the other Lake Poets. (Byron's irony could be called 'Byrony' - boom, boom.)
Another poem employing irony is Ve...
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

irony

[n] - a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs 2. [n] - incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=irony

Irony

saying [or writing] one thing, whilst meaning the opposite
Found on http://www.mantex.co.uk/samples/eng.htm

Irony

Irony is the name given to the effect of meaning created when one thing is said or written but another - sometimes opposite - thing is meant. In speech this effect is created by tone of voice in writing by carefully chosen lexis. The study of such meaning falls within the area known as pragmatics.…
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsa-m.htm

Irony

a device where words conveying a meaning different from the apparent meaning are used, sometimes to emphasise a point or a situation. Dramatic irony occurs when an audience is given privileged information which is unknown to the relevant character(s). e.g. Spoken by a dying man who is unaware of his condition; 'I think the future is a bright and be...
Found on http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~media/hrc_style.html

Irony

I'ron·y adjective [ From Iron .] 1. Made or consisting of iron; partaking of iron; iron; as, irony chains; irony particles. [ R.] Woodward. 2. Resembling iron in taste, hardness, or other physical property.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/96

Irony

I'ron·y noun [ Latin ironia , Greek ... dissimulation, from ... a dissembler in speech, from ... to speak; perhaps akin to English word : confer French ironie .] 1. Dissimulation; ignorance feigned for the purpose of confounding or provoking an antagonist. 2. A so...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/96

irony

1. Made or consisting of iron; partaking of iron; iron; as, irony chains; irony particles. ... 2. Resembling iron taste, hardness, or other physical property. ... Origin: From Iron. ... Source: Websters Dictionary ... (01 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

irony

noun incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs; `the irony of Ireland`s copying the nation she most hated`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=irony

irony

noun a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=irony

Irony

• (a.) Resembling iron taste, hardness, or other physical property. • (n.) Dissimulation; ignorance feigned for the purpose of confounding or provoking an antagonist. • (n.) A sort of humor, ridicule, or light sarcasm, which adopts a mode of speech the meaning of which is contrary to the literal sense of the words. • (a.) Made o...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/irony/

irony

language device, either in spoken or written form in which the real meaning is concealed or contradicted by the literal meanings of the words (verbal ... [8 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/40

irony

irony (s), ironies (pl) 1. The use of words to express something different from and often opposite to their literal meaning. 2. An expression or utterance marked by a deliberate contrast between apparent and intended meaning. A literary style employing such contrasts for humorous or rhetorical effect. 3. Something that happens that is inc...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2869/

irony

stating something by saying another quite different thing, sometimes its opposite. An example is Sir Thomas Wyatt's 'And I have leave to go, of her goodness' from his 'They flee from me.'
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

irony

There is a contrast between what is said and what is meant. This is either done accidentally or on purpose by the author.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

irony

irony, figure of speech in which what is stated is not what is meant. The user of irony assumes that his reader or listener understands the concealed meaning of his statement. Perhaps the simplest form of irony is rhetorical irony, when, for effect, a speaker says the direct opposite of what she mea...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0825510.html

Irony

Irony (from the Greek eironeia meaning dissimulation), is a form of speech in which the meaning intended to be conveyed is contrary to the natural meaning of the words. Irony, as a rhetorical device, becomes a most effective weapon for ridiculing an antagonist. Some of the Athenian orators were great masters of this refined mode of derision.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AI.HTM
No exact match found