irony

  1. witty language used to convey insults or scorn
  2. incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
  3. a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs

Irony

Contained in much theatre. When a word or action implies or conveys the opposite meaning to that we expect.

irony

[n] - a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs 2. [n] - incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=irony

Irony

Irony is the name given to the effect of meaning created when one thing is said or written but another - sometimes opposite - thing is meant. In speech this effect is created by tone of voice in writing by carefully chosen lexis. The study of such meaning falls within the area known as pragmatics.…
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsa-m.htm

irony

noun incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs; `the irony of Ireland`s copying the nation she most hated`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=irony

irony

noun a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=irony

irony

There is a contrast between what is said and what is meant. This is either done accidentally or on purpose by the author.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

Irony

hiding what is actually reality in order to obtain a desired oratorical or artistic effect; a favorite technique for London's social commentary.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21416

Irony

Cicero referred to irony as 'saying one thing and meaning another.' Irony comes in many forms. Verba
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

irony

primary use the use of words to express something other than and esp. the opposite of the literal meaning
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/23110
No exact match found