Infinitive

Infinitive is a grammatical term used to refer to certain verb forms that exist in many languages. As with many linguistic concepts, there is not a single definition applicable to all languages. The word is derived from Late Latin infinitivus, a derivative of infinitus meaning `infinite`. Infinitives are used mostly as non-finite verbs. In tradi.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infinitive

Infinitive

The infinitive is the base form of the verb without any additional endings. For example, play is an infinitive form (as opposed to playing, played or plays). The infinitive is used with many auxiliary verbs: I will play  he should play  do you play? The infinitive is often used with to (to play, to eat etc): I ought to play  I want to pla...
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

infinitive

(from the article `Celtic languages`) Another feature of Insular Celtic is its lack of the infinitive form of the verb found in most other Indo-European languages—e.g., English `to do,` ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/i/21

infinitive

[adj] - formed with the infinitive 2. [adj] - not having inflections to indicate tense 3. [n] - the uninflected form of the verb
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=infinitive

Infinitive

• (adv.) In the manner of an infinitive mood. • (n.) An infinitive form of the verb; a verb in the infinitive mood; the infinitive mood. • (n.) Unlimited; not bounded or restricted; undefined.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/infinitive/

infinitive

noun the uninflected form of the verb
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=infinitive

Infinitive

In·fin'i·tive noun [ Latin infinitivus : confer French infinitif . See Infinite .] Unlimited; not bounded or restricted; undefined. Infinitive mood (Gram.) , that form of the verb which merely names the action, and performs the office of a verbal noun. Some gr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/54

Infinitive

A form of a verb without tense and often introduced by 'to' infinitive forms can replace noun phrases as subject or object of a verb, e.g. Object: He likes to eat subject: To fish is a very relaxing way to spend the morning.…
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsa-m.htm

Infinitive

Infinitive is the indefinite mood of a verb, or that in which the verb is represented without a subject; the mere name-form of the verb. As the verb expresses an action, or a state, it generally belongs to a subject whose action or state is expressed; but if we wish to express the mere idea of this action or state we use the infinitive, which; ther...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AI.HTM

infinitive

infinitive: see mood; tense.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0914674.html
No exact match found