idiom

a sequence of words which functions semantically as a unit and with an unpredictable meaning (e.g. kick the bucket, meaning die). This is generally accompanied by a degree of syntactic restriction.

idiom

[n] - an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=idiom

Idiom

a sequence of words which forms a whole unit of meaning
Found on http://www.mantex.co.uk/samples/eng.htm

idiom

(Idiomatic language (idiom / idiomatic phrase)) Idiomatic language refers to many words or phrases that are a familiar and everyday feature of our language. Idioms are a part of the comfortable, conversational style of language we use daily - but to a foreigner, idioms are difficult to understand because their meaning is very different from the lit...
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsa-m.htm

Idiom

An idiom is an expression which is not meant literally and whose meaning cannot be deduced from knowledge of the individual words. For example: You look a bit under the weather this morning. Are you all right? Try and keep to the point of the discussion. You're always introducing red herrings. You and I have the same problems - we're in the same b...
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

Idiom

Id'i·om (ĭd'ĭ*ŭm) noun [ French idiome , Latin idioma , from Greek 'idi`wma , from 'idioy^n to make a person's own, to make proper or peculiar; from 'i`dios one's own, proper, peculiar; probably akin to the reflexive pronoun o'y...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/4

idiom

1. The syntactical or structural form peculiar to any language; the genius or cast of a language. 'Idiom may be employed loosely and figuratively as a synonym of language or dialect, but in its proper sense it signifies the totality of the general rules of construction which characterise the syntax of a particular language and distinguish it from o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

idiom

phrasal idiom noun an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=idiom

Idiom

• (n.) Dialect; a variant form of a language. • (n.) An expression conforming or appropriate to the peculiar structural form of a language; in extend use, an expression sanctioned by usage, having a sense peculiar to itself and not agreeing with the logical sense of its structural form; also, the phrase forms peculiar to a particular auth...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/idiom/

idiom

idiom 1. The way of using a particular language that comes naturally to its native speakers and involves both knowledge of its grammar and familiarity with its usage. 2. The style of expression of a specific individual or group. 3. The characteristic style of an artist or artistic group. 4. A fixed, distinctive, and often colorful expression whose...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2794/2

idiom

A special way of expressing an idea, characteristic of the language at that particular time.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

idiom

Group of words with a meaning of its own that is different from the meanings of each individual word in the group (for example, `It's raining cats and dogs` means `It's raining heavily` and kick the bucket means `to die`); also a style of expression in writing, speech, or music that is ty...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038712.html

Idiom

[disambiguation] An idiom is an expression with a figurative meaning. Idiom may also refer to: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idiom_(disambiguation)

Idiom

An idiom (idioma, `special property`, f. ἰδίωμα – idiōma, `special feature, special phrasing`, f. ἴδιος – idios, `one’s own`) is a combination of words that have a figurative meaning owing to its common usage. An idiom`s figurative meaning is separate from the literal meaning. There are thousands of idioms and they occur...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idiom

idiom

an expression whose meaning is different from the meaning of the individual words
Found on http://www.macmillandictionaries.com/features/glossary/dictionary-terms/

idiom

style appropriate to a specific medium, its capacities and limitations. Also used to mean style in general.
Found on http://www.whitstablechoral.org.uk/membership/glossary-of-musical-terms/

Idiom

In its loosest sense, the word idiom is often used as a synonym for dialect or idiolect. In its more
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Idiom

[structural nature of language] Idiom in the noncount sense of the word is `the syntactical, grammatical, or structural form peculiar to a language`. It is the realized structural nature of a language, in contrast with all other possible but unrealized structural forms that could have developed to serve the same semantic purpose but did not...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idiom_(structural_nature_of_language)

idiom

expression whose meaning cannot be inferred from its words
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/151263
No exact match found