idiom

a sequence of words which functions semantically as a unit and with an unpredictable meaning (e.g. kick the bucket, meaning die). This is generally accompanied by a degree of syntactic restriction.

idiom

a phrase or expression producing meaning beyond the sum of the words.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/a/american-poets-of-the-20th-century

idiom

an expression whose meaning is different from the meaning of the individual words
Found on http://www.macmillandictionaries.com/features/glossary/dictionary-terms/

Idiom

An idiom (idioma, `special property`, f. ἰδίωμα – idiōma, `special feature, special phrasing`, f. ἴδιος – idios, `one’s own`) is a combination of words that have a figurative meaning owing to its common usage. An idiom`s figurative meaning is separate from the literal meaning. There are thousands of idioms and they occur...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idiom

Idiom

An idiom is an expression which is not meant literally and whose meaning cannot be deduced from knowledge of the individual words. For example: You look a bit under the weather this morning. Are you all right? Try and keep to the point of the discussion. You're always introducing red herrings. You and I have the same problems - we're in the same b...
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

idiom

(Idiomatic language (idiom / idiomatic phrase)) Idiomatic language refers to many words or phrases that are a familiar and everyday feature of our language. Idioms are a part of the comfortable, conversational style of language we use daily - but to a foreigner, idioms are difficult to understand because their meaning is very different from the lit...
Found on http://www.englishbiz.co.uk/grammar/main_files/definitionsa-m.htm

idiom

[n] - an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=idiom

Idiom

• (n.) Dialect; a variant form of a language. • (n.) An expression conforming or appropriate to the peculiar structural form of a language; in extend use, an expression sanctioned by usage, having a sense peculiar to itself and not agreeing with the logical sense of its structural form; also, the phrase forms peculiar to a particular auth...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/idiom/

idiom

phrasal idiom noun an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Idiom

[structural nature of language] Idiom in the noncount sense of the word is `the syntactical, grammatical, or structural form peculiar to a language`. It is the realized structural nature of a language, in contrast with all other possible but unrealized structural forms that could have developed to serve the same semantic purpose but did not...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idiom_(structural_nature_of_language)

Idiom

Id'i·om (ĭd'ĭ*ŭm) noun [ French idiome , Latin idioma , from Greek 'idi`wma , from 'idioy^n to make a person's own, to make proper or peculiar; from 'i`dios one's own, proper, peculiar; probably akin to the reflexive pronoun o'y...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/I/4

idiom

1. The syntactical or structural form peculiar to any language; the genius or cast of a language. 'Idiom may be employed loosely and figuratively as a synonym of language or dialect, but in its proper sense it signifies the totality of the general rules of construction which characterise the syntax of a particular language and distinguish it from o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Idiom

A group of words whose meaning is different from the meanings of the individual words
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary082.htm

Idiom

a sequence of words which forms a whole unit of meaning
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20403

idiom

A set of words which always co-occur and where the meaning is not necessarily derived by concatenating the individual parts of the idiom, e.g to take coals to Newcastle 'to do something entirely superfluous'.
Found on https://www.uni-due.de/ELE/LinguisticGlossary.html

idiom

A special way of expressing an idea, characteristic of the language at that particular time.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

idiom

expression whose meaning cannot be inferred from its words
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/151263

idiom

expression whose meaning cannot be inferred from its words
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/40039

idiom

expression whose meaning cannot be inferred from its words
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206

idiom

Group of words with a meaning of its own that is different from the meanings of each individual word in the group (for example, `It's raining cats and dogs` means `It's raining heavily` and kick the bucket means `to die`); also a style of expression in writing, speech, or music that is ty...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0038712.html

idiom

idiom 1. The way of using a particular language that comes naturally to its native speakers and involves both knowledge of its grammar and familiarity with its usage. 2. The style of expression of a specific individual or group. 3. The characteristic style of an artist or artistic group. 4. A fixed, distinctive, and often colorful expression whose...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2794/2

Idiom

In its loosest sense, the word idiom is often used as a synonym for dialect or idiolect. In its more
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

idiom

style appropriate to a specific medium, its capacities and limitations. Also used to mean style in general.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22288
No exact match found