Humour

Hippocrates postulated a theory that disease was due to an imbalance of body fluids or humours in the body. Hippocrates described four humours and also believed that they were responsible for personality traits or types, so this theory is the origin of some descriptions of personality today. The humours described by Hippocrates, followed by the per … ...

humour

1. <physiology> A normal functioning fluid or semifluid of the body (as the blood, lymph or bile) especially of vertebrates. ... 2. A secretion that is itself an excitant of activity (as certain hormones). ... (06 Mar 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

humour

sense of humour noun the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous; `she didn`t appreciate my humor`; `you can`t survive in the army without a sense of humor`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=humour

humour

(from Latin `liquid,` or `fluid`), in early Western physiological theory, one of the four fluids of the body that were thought to determine a ... [7 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/82

humour

communication in which the stimulus produces amusement.[15 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/82

humour

1. a normal functioning fluid or semifluid of the body (as the blood, lymph or bile) especially of vertebrates. 2. a secretion that is itself an excitant of activity (as certain hormones).
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio39.html

humour

humor, humour (British) 1. A comic, absurd, or incongruous quality causing amusement. 2. That which is intended to induce laughter or amusement: a writer skilled at crafting humor. 3. The ability to perceive, enjoy, or express what is amusing, comical, incongruous, or absurd. 4. Etymology: from 1340, 'fluid' or 'juice of an animal or plant', fr.....
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1005/

humour

The use of comic elements intended to amuse the reader or spectator.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

Humour

(a) Jocose imagination; sympathetic wit. (b) Romantic irony, equivalent of the triumph of the creative power of the artist's soul over all content and all form (Hegel). -- L.V.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/h.html

humour

Latin humor = liquid, hence the aqueous and vitreous humour of the eyeball.
Found on http://www.anatomy.usyd.edu.au/glossary/glossary.cgi?

Humour

Humour or humor (see spelling differences) is the tendency of particular cognitive experiences to provoke laughter and provide amusement. The term derives from the humoral medicine of the ancient Greeks, which taught that the balance of fluids in the human body, known as humours (Latin: humor, `body fluid`), controlled human health and emotion. .....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humour
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