Humor

[positive psychology] Humor is defined as “the tendency of particular cognitive responses to provoke laughter, physical reaction, and provide amusement.” Humor is experienced across all ages and cultures. In positive psychology, humor is studied in a variety of functions, particularly as a coping mechanism and as a character strength in...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humor_(positive_psychology)

humor

[n] - one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed (in ancient and medieval physiology) to determine your emotional and physical state 2. [n] - the quality of being funny 3. [n] - the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous 4. [v] - put into a good mood
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=humor

Humor

Humor: In medicine, humor refers to a fluid (or semifluid) substance. Thus, the aqueous humor is the fluid normally present in the front and rear chambers of the eye. The humors ran through an ancient theory that held that health came from balance between the bodily liquids. These liquids were termed humors. Disease arose when there was imbalance b...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3816

Humor

Hu'mor noun [ Middle English humour , Old French humor , umor , French humeur , Latin humor , umor , moisture, fluid, from humere , umere , to be moist. See Humid .] [ Written also humour .] 1. Moisture, especially, the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/70

Humor

Hu'mor transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Humored ; present participle & verbal noun Humoring .] 1. To comply with the humor of; to adjust matters so as suit the peculiarities, caprices, or exigencies of; to adapt one's ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/70

humor

1. Moisture, especially, the moisture or fluid of animal bodies, as the chyle, lymph, etc.; as, the humors of the eye, etc. ... The ancient physicians believed that there were four humors (the blood, phlegm, yellow bile or choler, and black bile or melancholy), on the relative proportion of which the temperament and health depended. ... 2. <medi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

humor

humour noun the quality of being funny; `I fail to see the humor in it`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=humor

humor

humour verb put into a good mood
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=humor

humor

sense of humour noun the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous; `she didn`t appreciate my humor`; `you can`t survive in the army without a sense of humor`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=humor

humor

(hu´mәr) pl. humors, humo´res any fluid or semifluid in the body. adj., hu´moral., adj. aqueous humor the fluid produced in the eye and filling the spaces (anterior chamber and posterior chamber) in front of the lens and its attachments. It diffuses out of the eye into the b...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Humor

• (n.) That quality of the imagination which gives to ideas an incongruous or fantastic turn, and tends to excite laughter or mirth by ludicrous images or representations; a playful fancy; facetiousness. • (n.) Changing and uncertain states of mind; caprices; freaks; vagaries; whims. • (n.) A vitiated or morbid animal fluid, such as ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/humor/

humor

humor, humour (British) 1. A comic, absurd, or incongruous quality causing amusement. 2. That which is intended to induce laughter or amusement: a writer skilled at crafting humor. 3. The ability to perceive, enjoy, or express what is amusing, comical, incongruous, or absurd. 4. Etymology: from 1340, 'fluid' or 'juice of an animal or plant', fr.....
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1005/

Humor

Humor can be helpful in motivating students and in creating a community spirit.
Found on http://glossary.plasmalink.com/glossary.html

humor

humor, according to ancient theory, any of four bodily fluids that determined human health and temperament. Hippocrates postulated that an imbalance among the humors (blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile) resulted in pain and disease, and that good health was achieved through a balance of the ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0824524.html

humor

Type: Term Pronunciation: hyū′mŏr, hyū-mōr′is Definitions: 1. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomic substance. 2. One of the elemental body fluids that were the basis of the physiologic and pathologic teachings of the hippocratic school: blood, yellow bile, black bile, and phlegm.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=41699
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