Horseradish

(Armoracia) A. rusticana, the Horseradish, is a hardy, perennial herb, native to southeast Europe. It is such a zealous and stubborn plant that is has escaped from gardens and naturalized in some areas. Horseradish grows 2 to 2½ feet high at maturity and has large, coarse foliage resembling the common weed curly dock. The thick, deep root is edi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10004

Horseradish

Pungent perennial root vegetable used grated in horseradish sauce and cocktail sauce.
Found on http://www.chowbaby.com/10_2000/glossary/glossary.html?synchpage=13&Z=75017

horseradish

[n] - the root of the horseradish plant 2. [n] - coarse Eurasian plant cultivated for its thick white pungent root 3. [n] - grated horseradish root
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horseradish

noun grated horseradish root
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

horseradish

noun the root of the horseradish plant; it is grated or ground and used for seasoning
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

horseradish

(Armoracia lapathifolia), hardy perennial plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae, or Cruciferae). Its hotly pungent, fleshy root is used as a ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/71

Horseradish

Horseradish (Cochlearia Armoracia) is a Cruciferae native to south east Europe. The root is used in cookery as a condiment of beef, and has been since the Middle Ages. It was known as Red Cole in England in the 16th century.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/BH.HTM

horseradish

Hardy perennial plant, native to southeastern Europe but naturalized elsewhere. The thick cream-coloured root is strong-tasting and is often made into a savoury sauce to accompany food. (Armoracia rusticana, family Cruciferae.)
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horseradish

The name may have come from an English adaptation of its German name. In early times the plant grew wild in European coastal areas; the Germans called it meerrettich, or sea radish. The German word `meer” sounds like `mare” in English
Found on http://whatscookingamerica.net/Glossary/H.htm
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